Three Tiny Bush Vipers at Houston Zoo

By: Jackie Wallace

13415660_10154349183977526_1128220140336758444_oThis spring, three tiny green bush vipers were born on March 26. Like most pit vipers, the neonates were born live instead of hatched from eggs like many other types of snakes. Originally a part of a group of six, only three have survived and have doubled in weight since their birth. They are expected to grow to be between 18-24 inches long. Despite their name, green bush vipers vary in color, mostly shades of green, but can also be bright yellow or grey. These snakes are found in the tropical rainforests of western and central Africa and get their name from their preference for lower bushes rather than the tall canopy trees. Guests can see all kinds of exotic and local snakes in the zoo’s Reptile and Amphibian House. The baby snakes will remain behind-the-scenes while they continue to grow.

 

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Today, we are working with BBVA Compass Stadium to plant a new pollinator garden at the stadium! This beautiful new pollinator garden supports local pollinators like bees, butterflies, and more, and is located at the North entrance to BBVA Compass Stadium. Great partnership for an even greater good. ... See MoreSee Less

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I know you meant to say bees 🤣

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We have Attwater's prairie chicken eggs! Our bird team candles the eggs under a bright light to check on the developing chicks. The pencil marks on the eggs help us track where the air cell is within the egg. After a brief candling session, it's back into the incubators. ... See MoreSee Less

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We have Attwaters prairie chicken eggs! Our bird team candles the eggs under a bright light to check on the developing chicks. The pencil marks on the eggs help us track where the air cell is within the egg. After a brief candling session, its back into the incubators.Image attachment

 

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Beautiful birds!

Hoping for great success

Kimberly Jackson

Jeff Early