New Tiger Joins Houston Zoo Family

The Houston Zoo is proud to welcome their newest resident, an adult male tiger named Berani. The three-year-old, 280lb Malayan tiger made his Texas debut Tuesday morning after making the long journey to Houston from Point Defiance Zoo in Tacoma, WA in late January. The move was the result of a recommendation by the Association of Zoos & Aquariums (AZA) Species Survival Plan (SSP) to find Houston Zoo’s female Malayan tiger, Satu, a suitable companion.

© Stephanie Adams, Houston Zoo
© Stephanie Adams, Houston Zoo

Berani and Satu, will take turns in the tiger yard while they undergo a formal introduction process overseen by the zookeepers. They will spend increasingly longer periods of time together in the yard as they complete the formal introduction process.

Fewer than 3,500 tigers of all tiger subspecies remain in the wild today, according to the Tiger Conservation Campaign. Malayan tigers surviving on the Malay Peninsula are critically endangered with an estimated population of 300 remaining in the wild.



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Today, we are working with BBVA Compass Stadium to plant a new pollinator garden at the stadium! This beautiful new pollinator garden supports local pollinators like bees, butterflies, and more, and is located at the North entrance to BBVA Compass Stadium. Great partnership for an even greater good. ... See MoreSee Less

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I know you meant to say bees 🤣

Houston Zoo added 2 new photos.
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We have Attwater's prairie chicken eggs! Our bird team candles the eggs under a bright light to check on the developing chicks. The pencil marks on the eggs help us track where the air cell is within the egg. After a brief candling session, it's back into the incubators. ... See MoreSee Less

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We have Attwaters prairie chicken eggs! Our bird team candles the eggs under a bright light to check on the developing chicks. The pencil marks on the eggs help us track where the air cell is within the egg. After a brief candling session, its back into the incubators.Image attachment

 

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Beautiful birds!

Hoping for great success

Kimberly Jackson

Jeff Early