Sabinga's Updates: Wildlife Protection Efforts Near the Ocean

Sabinga-Profile-ResizeThe Houston Zoo is excited to welcome a new intern who comes to us all the way from Kenya, in East Africa. Sabinga is in the United States participating in the Community College Initiative Program (CCIP). The Community College Initiative Program is a program of the U.S. Department of State, administered by Northern Virginia Community College on behalf of the Community College Consortium (CCC) in partnership with Houston Community College. While participating in this program, he will join us at the zoo as an intern to learn all about what a modern-day zoo is like! Sabinga is already part of the conservation community as he has been working with Save the Elephants in Kenya for over 8 years. He will be documenting his experiences at the Zoo and we will share his thoughts with you here on our blog! Stay tuned for more!

Sabinga writes:
Do you know that Houston Zoo also doing their part to bolster dwindling populations of animals still living free in the wild? The sea turtle is an example. The green sea turtle gets its name not from the color of its shell but from the greenish shade of its fat. A saw-like beak helps these herbivores tear through vegetation. Their shells, which are lighter and more hydrodynamic than those of terrestrial turtles, allow them to glide easily through the water, while flippers enable them to swim long distances. Male sea turtles spend their entire lives at sea, but females return to the same beaches they were born on, once every two years or so, to lay eggs. It’s a unique creature!!

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Just a few days ago I was busy working on my computer when I heard a voice behind me asking me if I wanted to go into the field with Martha (Conservation Education Coordinator) and sea lion staff on the following Tuesday. I quickly realized the voice was Renee! (Conservation Programs Manager) But it took me lot of thinking to manage and organized my thoughts about word “field” in the zoo as I turn my chair to face her slowly buying time for my thoughts, the only thing running in my head is back in Kenya, in Save the Elephants where we go to the field on daily monitoring, community outreach and anti-poaching campaigns for wildlife. I turn to face her and still have no clue what she meant. My thoughts fail me. I repeated the same statement to her. “Field?” Maybe she though I repeated a word to her for confirmation, not knowing there was so much going in my head. And that was where my new lesson started about what field work with the Houston Zoo meant.

The 16th of December, 2014 Tuesday morning was our mission day of Surfside beach clean-up to protect animals like sea turtles, it took us approximately one hour, was a long drive but was a journey with lot of fun, lots of laugh and a great way to get a word out about the sea Turtles! Aiming to talk to beach residents in an effort to monitor, preserve and protect sea turtle and their vicinity as well as to educate the local residents on the plight of sea turtles and other marine animals, it is the same way Save the Elephants approaches the community on elephant poaching.

Martha had lot of responsibility; she was our team leader, driver and main spokesperson to the community although Sophie Darling and Heather Crane contributed too to the effort. I was keen to learn about how they approach the community! From my heroes (Martha, Sophie and Heather), my first impression was the sea turtle sign at the entry of the beach, this sign was made by the Houston Zoo graphics team in collaboration with  NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric administration) which is also the same way that Save the Elephants collaborates with the Kenyan Government -Kenya Wildlife Service.
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NOAA & Houston Zoo staff put fishing line recycling bins on a long jetty for fishermen to put their broken fishing line that is dangerous for the sea turtles and other marine animals.  We started cleaned the jetty from the far end coming where we began by collecting common marine debris items including things like cigarette butts, cans, plastic bags and bottles, styrofoam, balloons, lighters, discarded or lost fishing gear such as lines, nets and anything else dangerous to sea life. This is hard work but there is still a lot to be done.  We still need to do a lot of collecting and messaging to win this, we cannot give up!!!!

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Sophie and Heather’s comments on their experience, “It feels so good to be out and actively participating in such an important mission, I just wish that I could get every piece of monofilament out there! That was the hardest part, like you said, was having to come to terms with the fact that I couldn’t get everything.  I cannot wait to spread this to the community here at the Zoo and all over Houston! I feel extremely proud to be a part of all of this.”

The total amount or marine debris the sea lion team has collect this fall is:

  • 34.1 lbs of rope
  • 11 lbs of recycling
  • 26.4 lbs of trash
  • 2 lbs of monofilament (fishing line)

Why should we care about sea turtles? Just like other species, sea turtles are also important to the economy. Some fishermen depend on fishing for their jobs and if sea turtle go extinct, the underwater ecosystem would be unbalanced. Why? Sea turtles are one of the only animals that eat sea grass, and sea grasses need to be kept short. Why? So it can grow across the ocean floor. Why? Without the sea grass the species of fish that live there will be lost, the people that fish for them couldn’t anymore. What if that was YOU?  Some just think,  “oh well other people will care for them”; others may say, “I am busy with my business”  – yeah well many other people may be thinking other things – that is why we have this problem. So do your part. Please join us to save sea turtles by reducing the use of plastic bags so that they don’t end up in the ocean and cleaning the beach. It is of great value to our community and the world. We need to take action together, and spread the news! Your actions today affect tomorrow’s outcomes!

Discover What Makes the Houston Toad So Unique

IMG_9112The Houston Zoo is excited to welcome a new intern who comes to us all the way from Kenya, in East Africa. Gilbert Sabinga is in the United States as participating in the Community College Initiative Program (CCIP). The Community College Initiative Program is a program of the U.S. Department of State, administered by Northern Virginia Community College on behalf of the Community College Consortium (CCC) in partnership with Houston Community College. While participating in this program, he will join us at the zoo as an intern to learn all about what a modern-day zoo is like! Sabinga is already part of the conservation community as he has been working with Save the Elephants in Kenya for over 8 years. He will be documenting his experiences at the Zoo and we will share his thoughts with you here on our blog!

Sabinga writes:

Sabinga blogHouston Zoo is the nature in it’s wildest. Every day coming to the zoo it offers me a new chance to get up close from wildlife around the world, and learn close facts about the animals. This time I was introduced to toads!!!! The little I knew about the toads is valuable part of our outdoor heritage. Most of people probably don’t give them much thought, and rarely credit what we consider lesser life not with emotions big as ours; but we need these amphibians to control destructive insects and to offer their voices to the sounds of spring and summer nights. Just hearing or seeing them adds to our enjoyment of outdoor joy and makes our environment beautiful. I visited and got to help in the toad department under the instruction of Tyler Parker, who never get tired of me asking questions about toads. He really taught me much on toads and expanded my knowledge about the toads especially Houston toads.

Sabinga blog2Today, with species threatened and habitats disappearing worldwide, the Houston Zoo  is playing a new role in conservation: the Zoo is expanding their efforts far beyond keeping animals alive in captivity. An example of this is the toad quarantine facility that serves as a location for captive breeding and head- starting of Houston toads eggs stand for release in to the wild, and this facility is managed full-time by Houston toad specialists who care for the toads and work closely. I never thought of how great this is wow! Credit to toad keepers.

The best part is that we would all love to think that wild animals in reality are at least a little bit like they are in National Geographic movies – cute, cuddly and happy to be in human company. Certainly toads can get used to human caretakers. Dr. Lauren Howard held one told and I was surprised that the toad did not struggle and even closed its eyes! I was wondering is it love? Or, the warmth of Lauren’s hand, or cues from the toad that it enjoys the care.  We all need to care for these magnificent local Texas creatures.

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Amphibian species are now on the verge of extinction. How do we save them?

– Toads like to take their time crossing the road…give them a brake! Roadkill is a significant cause of toad and frog mortality in many parts of the world. So drive slower on wet nights. Help a frog or toad cross the road (careful: don’t cause an accident or get squashed yourself).

– If you are building a pond, and want to support a healthy toad community, do not stock fish in it–even native species. Fishless ponds always tend to have a higher amphibian biodiversity than do ponds with fish.

– Most of the products we use in our daily life, and even the things we take for granted (food, water, electricity) have been removed from their natural place in the environment. We therefore offer the following suggestions on how you can reduce your ecological footprint: Turn off your air conditioning when it’s not in use. Take a shorter shower. Put a lid on that pot of boiling water. Turn off your lights. Print on both sides of the sheet of paper. Turn your jacuzzi off when it’s not in use. Going for a picnic? Don’t use styrofoam plates; most supermarkets sell biodegradable corn plates.

For more information visit; conservation@houstonzoo.org

Point to remember; Toads may be begging for their environmental freedom!!!

Guest Blogger Carolyn Jess Talks Giraffes

We have invited Carolyn Jess back to help us out as guest blogger in 2013 with a focus on native wildlife. Jess is a 13 year old student who has agreed to be our special guest blogger about wildlife conservation. We first met Carolyn in October 2011 when she came out to the Zoo to meet our special guest Jack Hannah. If you would like to contact Carolyn or have comments, you may send them to conservation@houstonzoo.org.

Have you heard of The Call of The Wild Speaker series at The Houston Zoo?  The Zoo has many important people who work directly with endangered or threatened animals and has them speak in the evenings at the Brown Education Center.  The speakers are people who have a passion about the wildlife they work to protect and share a lot of their knowledge with their audience.  The speaker series is open to anyone who wants to come. All you have to do is just sign up on the website.

I recently got to listen to Julian Fennessy at the Speaker Series talk last month.  He is the Executive Director of Giraffe Conservation Foundation (GCF) and he is very passionate about giraffes.  He shared some information with us about giraffes that I was not aware of.

I always pictured there to be plenty of giraffes roaming the savannas of Africa, but I discovered that is not exactly true.  Giraffe populations are falling very fast and there are many reasons for that.  The first reason is poaching.  I never thought that someone would actually poach a giraffe, but they are actually another source of bush meat that is often sold illegally in markets.  Giraffes are actually easy to hunt because they  pretty much stand still and glare at the threat before they run away.  This makes them easy targets for poaching.  Some people believe that giraffe hair is lucky, so their tails are cut off to get the hair to make bracelets and jewelry.

Another threat to the giraffes is loss of their habitat.  Many times the land the giraffes live on is clear cut for agriculture and to harvest lumber, which causes the giraffe to have to move elsewhere, but they are running out of space to move.

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What Julian and his group do is study the giraffes and their movements.  This is not an easy task, so one way to do this is to attach a satellite tracking collar to the giraffe’s neck.  Julian explained that this is a tricky thing to do, but through hard work and taking some time, the tracking collars are placed on the giraffes.  The Giraffe Conservation group tracks the giraffes’ movements using GPS units.

The Giraffe Conservation Fund is working hard to protect the giraffes in Africa.  Through educating the public and the people who live and work around the giraffes in Africa, our giraffes will have a chance at survival.  You can help the giraffes too by telling others about the giraffe issue and donating your used GPS devices to the Houston Zoo.  Just drop them into the cell phone recycling box beside the entrance to the guest service office at the entrance of the Zoo.  They will send them to the GCF to help track the giraffes’ movements in the wild.  Every time you visit the Zoo you help save animals in the wild!

Guest Blogger Carolyn Jess Talks Bushmeat

We have invited Carolyn Jess back to continue to help us out as guest blogger in 2014 with a focus on native wildlife. Jess is a 13 year old student who has agreed to be our special guest blogger about wildlife conservation and is currently working on the Houston Zoo Crew. If you would like to contact Carolyn or have comments, you may send them to conservation@houstonzoo.org.

I never have heard of the Bushmeat Crisis until I visited the Houston Zoo this past weekend. I was on my lunch break for Zoo Crew training and was looking around at everything I could. I got to the primate area and read some of the signs, and that’s where I found out about the Bushmeat Crisis.

In Africa, the forests are also called “the bush”.  The animals that live in the bush, many of them endangered animals, are killed so that they can be eaten.  Chimpanzee, elephants and gorillas are just a few of the animals that are killed to eat.   It is a big industry now and people in Africa are making a lot of money from selling bushmeat, so much that when these people hunt, they are not thinking about just killing a few animals, but all that they can shoot.

That’s not all though.  Once the animal is shot, there is often a baby left behind without their parent.  These animals are taken as well and sold as pets or sold off to another place.  These animals usually die on their way to the market due to the containers they are shipped in.  The containers are often too small or don’t have holes for oxygen to get in.  Because of this, there has been a number of sanctuaries  opened to help take care of these orphaned babies and the workers help raise awareness of this problem.

These animals deserve better than this.  There are alternative food sources, but this meat is cheap and in big demand.  There are many things you can do to help stop this horrible crisis.  First of all, become aware of the problem and tell others.  You can visit the Bushmeat Crisis Task Force website to get information sent to you.  You can also get your senators to help.  Jane Goodall has a website for you to type in your name and address and a  letter will be sent to your senator.  The senators can support the African governments with making stricter laws for poaching and owning illegal animals.  You can also support a wildlife refuge or wildlife sanctuary in Africa. If people are aware of this problem, then we can all try to help.  If no one knows or reads about it, the problem will go on and our wildlife in Africa will disappear.

Guest Blogger Carolyn Jess Talks Recycling Cell Phones

We have invited Carolyn Jess back to help us out as guest blogger in 2014 with a focus on native wildlife. Jess is a 13 year old student who has agreed to be our special guest blogger about wildlife conservation. We first met Carolyn in October 2011 when she came out to the Zoo to meet our special guest Jack Hannah. If you would like to contact Carolyn or have comments, you may send them to conservation@houstonzoo.org.

For the second year, my school is participating in the Action For Apes cell phone recycling challenge.  Schools and businesses are invited to take action and enter this competition.  The goal of the program is to recycle as many old cell phones as you can.  The top prize is a really cool painting done by the chimps here at the Houston Zoo.  Rasco Middle School, where I went to school last year, won the painting and it is still hanging up in the hallway.  That is great for Rasco, but now I need a chimp painting for the hallway at Lake Jackson Intermediate.  I am hoping my school will step up and accept this challenge.
action for apes

Whether my school wins or loses, the real winners are the chimps and apes that live in the African Congo.   That is where the mineral coltan is mined.  Coltan is the material in electronics that holds electric charges.  The coltan is really being mined hard on the boundary of the Kahuzi  Biega National Park.  There, the gorilla population has been cut in half due to the mining of coltan.  The forest there that was once lush and green is being torn down and dug up.  The amount of coltan that is being exported every year is increasing largely.

Coltan is mined kind of like gold was mined back in the 1800s.  Large holes are dug, layers of dirt are put into screens, and then water is added to wash away the small pieces.  What’s left are the chunks of coltan.

We can help though.  If we reduce the need for coltan by recycling our old phones and electronics, we reduce the amount of mining that needs to be done.  You can help reduce the need for mining coltan by joining the Action for Apes challenge.  Encourage your school or business to take part.  You can also take your old phones to the Houston Zoo to recycle.  (Or you can give them to me!) Even if my school does not win the painting, we have won part of this battle for the Congo by teaching people about this problem.  Be a hero and recycle your electronics today.

Guest Blogger Carolyn Jess Spots Whooping Cranes

We have invited Carolyn Jess back to help us out as guest blogger in 2013 with a focus on native wildlife. Jess is a 12 year old student who has agreed to be our special guest blogger about wildlife conservation. We first met Carolyn in October 2011 when she came out to the Zoo to meet our special guest Jack Hannah. If you would like to contact Carolyn or have comments, you may send them to conservation@houstonzoo.org.

Recently,  I was able to participate in the Audubon Christmas Bird Count at the Brazoria National Wildlife Refuge with my Junior Naturalist group.    We volunteer every year to help identify and check off the birds we see.  It was very cold that day, but we were all prepared and had lots of layers of clothes on along with our binoculars, scope, bird guides, and checklists.  We were able to find almost 30 different species of birds in our 15 mile radius.

The Audubon Society always needs volunteers to help with the bird counts.  It’s a fun family activity that you can take part in during the holidays.   Another fun family activity to do over the Christmas break is to go to Rockport to see the whooping cranes.  There are a lot of tour boats and charter boats that take families and groups out to go see the whooping cranes.

The whooping crane is the tallest North American bird and grows to be five feet tall and have a wingspan of seven and a half feet.  They are white with a red head and black wing tips.  They mate for life and produce one chick per year.    Whooping cranes breed in Canada and migrate down to the Texas Gulf Coast in the winter months.  The whooping crane is an endangered species – there are only about 300 of them left.  In the 1940s, there were only about 20 whooping cranes.  The 300 we have now are all descendants of those original 20.  Their population was being wiped out by hunting and loss of habitat.  Hopefully, with our conservation efforts, we will continue to increase their numbers.   If you would like to help out the whooping crane, you can visit the International Crane Foundation.  They list ways you can help this endangered species survive.

Guest Blogger Carolyn Jess Talks Recycling

We have invited Carolyn Jess back to help us out as guest blogger in 2013 with a focus on native wildlife. Jess is a 12 year old student who has agreed to be our special guest blogger about wildlife conservation. We first met Carolyn in October 2011 when she came out to the Zoo to meet our special guest Jack Hannah. If you would like to contact Carolyn or have comments, you may send them to conservation@houstonzoo.org.

Does your school recycle?  My school recycling program is going well and I hope that other schools have started their recycling programs.  November 15 is America Recycles Day, so this month is a great time to start a recycling program for your school, church or business.  Two years ago, when I was in middle school, we had recycling bins set up in every classroom and the green recycling dumpsters in the back of my school.  It looked like we had a good recycling program, until one afternoon,  I noticed that the custodians took the papers in the recycling bins and threw them in the regular trash.  I went to my school principal, told her what I saw, and asked if I could start a school recycling club.  She said yes and was very supportive.   During those two years, I had about 40 kids that helped recycle papers, boxes and plastic bottles once a week.  This year I moved on to the intermediate school.  I found out there had been programs to recycle in the past, but not this year.  In September, my student council and some of my old recycling club members got together here at my new school and got our recycling club started again and recycle once a week.

It is very easy to set up a program for recycling.  If you are a student and you are not sure if your school recycles,  ask your principal.  If you don’t have a program,  you should get permission to start a club – just taking out the accumulated papers once a week  makes a huge difference for our environment.  There are even recycling contests your school can enter and the top prize is $1000.   All you have to do is have your school register and keep up with how much you are recycling.

So many things depend on a clean environment.  Papers, boxes, and plastic bags can all be recycled, but  they always seem to be on the side of the road or in wetland areas.  If we recycle these things, we can Keep Texas Beautiful.

Carolyn Jess Helps Novia the Ocelot Celebrate

We have invited Carolyn Jess back to help us out as guest blogger in 2013 with a focus on native wildlife. Jess is a 12 year old student who has agreed to be our special guest blogger about wildlife conservation. We first met Carolyn in October 2011 when she came out to the Zoo to meet our special guest Jack Hannah. If you would like to contact Carolyn or have comments, you may send them to conservation@houstonzoo.org.

Happy Birthday Novia!  Novia, the ocelot, just celebrated her 5th birthday at the Houston Zoo.  She had a really nice party with delicious presents and lots of people to help her celebrate.  Novia’s birthday is definitely worth celebrating since she was not expected to live past two years old. Novia – which means girlfriend in Spanish- was brought to the zoo to breed with the ocelot that was already there.  The keepers discovered that Novia had some health problems and she had to be spayed.  Her boyfriend was brought to another zoo and was able to have babies there, but Novia was not expected to survive much longer.  Her health issues were pretty bad.  The zoo staff did not give up on her though.  The carnivore keepers gave her lots of love and attention along with antibiotics and vitamins to make her stronger.  Through the care of the keepers and their support, Novia pulled through.  She is truly a survivor, so turning five years old was a big reason to celebrate!

I was able to help get Novia’s party prepared.     I went in with her keeper to Novia’s enclosure.  Novia was waiting quietly and watching as we walked through her home.  I helped stuff some of her favorite things in the colorful boxes and bags that she would soon open.  Some of the items were: fish, a bone,  dead mice, squid, shrimp and a lobster.   While the keepers and I stuffed the bags and boxes with treats, a crowd was starting to gather to help this girl celebrate her birthday.  Novia was curious to see what was going on. As soon as she walked in, she went straight for her presents.  I am glad to say she went to my present first and quickly devoured the dead mouse I set out for her.  She dug further in to get the rest of the treats.  After a while, she found her biggest present, the lobster, and disappeared in the bushes with it.  We could not see her, but we could hear the crunch as she enjoyed her birthday gift.   The celebration was enjoyed by everyone who came to see it – especially Novia.

There were other events going on Saturday as well.  The Houston Zoo held an Enrichment Day which was a great way to see how animals have fun in their habitats.  Throughout the enclosures were lots of decorations and enrichment toys that the animals love to play with, smell, or even eat.    Animal enrichment happens daily here at the zoo.  Enrichment helps strengthen the animals physically and mentally.  It keeps their minds sharp and keeps their bodies healthy.  The zoo staff was very busy teaching guests about the importance of enrichment.  Enrichment Day was a great way to see up close what happens every day behind the scenes.  To the animals that live here, it was just another fun day, but to the parents and kids who came out, it was a great way to see what really happens here at the zoo.

Guest Blogger: Carolyn Jess Talks About Her Time at Camp

We have invited Carolyn Jess back to help us out as guest blogger in 2013 with a focus on native wildlife. Jess is a 12 year old student who has agreed to be our special guest blogger about wildlife conservation. We first met Carolyn in October 2011 when she came out to the Zoo to meet our special guest Jack Hannah. If you would like to contact Carolyn or have comments, you may send them to conservation@houstonzoo.org.

I just finished my Keeper Training Camp at the Houston Zoo.  If you have not taken one of the Camp Zoofari sessions before, you should try one.  My class went to a lot of the keeper talks and heard about animal diets, how they animals are trained, and what a day for an animal keeper is like.  One of the most interesting things I got to watch was the kookaburras eat. If you aren’t familiar with how this species feeds, you should definitely try to find some videos online.

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While I was at camp, I noticed a sign up about palm oil.  I had not heard much about palm oil before and looked it up this weekend.  Palm oil is in about 50% of items sold in grocery stores.  It is used in chocolate candy, many snack foods, and ice cream.  Basically, huge amounts of rainforests are being cut down and replaced with palm plantations.  That doesn’t sound too bad, right? Wrong!  The animals that are used to living in the rainforest can’t survive on palm plantations.  These animals are losing their homes and starving when their rainforest home is taken away.  This sounds similar to our ocelot and blind salamander.  These animals are losing their homes because of humans.

The first thing you can do to help the rainforest animals is to be aware of this problem and tell your friends.  Write to your favorite snack food company and ask them to not use palm oil from destructed forests.  If they get enough letters, they may listen.  You want to buy from companies who are in the RSPO – Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil.

This is a problem that has some very bad consequences.  If we work together, animals and our environment will be better off.  We can’t wait until it is too late.

Carolyn Jess Talks Earth Day & Arbor Day

We have invited Carolyn Jess back to help us out as guest blogger in 2013 with a focus on native wildlife. Jess is a 12 year old student who has agreed to be our special guest blogger about wildlife conservation. We first met Carolyn in October 2011 when she came out to the Zoo to meet our special guest Jack Hannah. If you would like to contact Carolyn or have comments, you may send them to conservation@houstonzoo.org.

Happy Earth and Arbor Day!  As you think of ideas to help our environment and conserve resources, here is another way to help that you may not have thought of:  Action for Apes Challenge.  Several Houston Area schools and organizations are taking part in this great service learning program by encouraging their friends and family to recycle used cell phones.  It’s important to recycle your used cell phones because they contain a mineral called coltan.  Coltan is destructively mined in the African Congo where the chimpanzees and gorilla habitats are.  If we can recycle used cell phones, cameras, and laptop computers, less of the mineral is needed from this important wildlife area.  More coltan recycled means less mining of coltan in the Congo.

You can also help by keeping your cell phone for as long as possible or even buying a refurbished phone.  If you would like to recycle your old cell phones, the Houston Zoo or area schools competing in the challenge will take them.  The school that has the most cell phones collected wins a great prize!  It is a hand painted picture by the Houston Zoo’s chimps.  Really though, everyone comes out a winner.  When we can make people aware of the need to recycle, the real challenge has been met.  You can make a difference to the chimps and gorillas in the Congo.  Recycle your old phones today.

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We're closed today, January 16. Stay warm and dry, Houston! ... See MoreSee Less

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Comment on Facebook

Keep the animals warm!

Why? What's goin on!?

Stay warm as you take care of our lovely zoo and it’s residents❤️

Misty Flanigan no zoo for Connor

Thank you to all the wonderful staff that went in to take care of their critter babies! Be safe!

Stay warm sweet animals 🦁🐯🐒🦆🐅🐆🦓🦏🐘🦍🦒

Too cold! Good idea.

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We are open on this beautiful Monday! Get out and enjoy the weather before it gets extra chilly this week.

 

Comment on Facebook

Giraffe feeding was awesome! Only wished we were given even more lettuce!

Had a great time today

We are here. 😀

Don't miss out before we turn off the lights! This is the last weekend for TXU Energy Presents Zoo Lights. Bundle up, grab your friends and family and join us for Houston's favorite hoilday tradition.

We even have a special discount to end the season. For just $9 per person, you get to see all two million lights, Candy the Zoo Lights Zebra, and musical reflection pool! zoolights.houstonzoo.org/get-tickets/
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Dont miss out before we turn off the lights! This is the last weekend for TXU Energy Presents Zoo Lights. Bundle up, grab your friends and family and join us for Houstons favorite hoilday tradition. 

We even have a special discount to end the season. For just $9 per person, you get to see all two million lights, Candy the Zoo Lights Zebra, and musical reflection pool! https://zoolights.houstonzoo.org/get-tickets/

 

Comment on Facebook

My daughter lost her FAVORITE stuffed animal last night. We were there after 8:30. Please contact me if found. She is very very sad

Dianne Ramboer Dunn and Wendy Martinez we're going tonight! Maybe I'll go live for you, grandma! : )

We visited today for daughters 3rd birthday, thank you we had a great day. It was a bit cold so we bundled up and enjoyed the zoo being so quiet, we got to feed giraffes twice! Would recommend!

How is it $9?

Cuanto esta la eñtrada y ban estar las luces mañana para ir com mi familia?

When is the last day to see the lights?

Lupe Mcmillon you should take Emma and Ethan

Aldo Castellanos Isabel Zamarripa-Hernandez Juan Francisco Hernandez $9 el boleto, que dicen?? Este es el último fin de semana

Busca quien nos lleve jajaja Socorro Garcia Ponce 🤣😂

Patricia Lozada tomorrow at 6pm meet us there? :0)

Debbie R Hernandez-Sanchez

Angel Rodriguez

Roxy AR

Valarie Ann Romero

Enrique Gonzalez last chance

Erica Villarreal 9$

Kayla Fitzpatrick

Macie Quick

Callie Wade

Hina Suleman

Griseldaa Chavezz

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