How Bees are Helping to Improve Human-Elephant Relationships

In recent years bees have been receiving more and more attention as the loss of pollinators becomes a more pressing concern around the globe. We know that the small but mighty bee is one of the best pollinators around, helping to produce up to 30% of the foods we eat, but it may surprise you to hear that these little guys are key players in helping to protect the world’s largest land mammal – elephants!

Elephants are expert foragers, and because of their large size, they need to eat A LOT of food every single day. As human development continues to spread, the land that elephants use to browse for food often merges with agricultural areas created by farmers. Unfortunately, when elephants stumble onto these crop fields they see the crops as an easy meal, and can cause a great deal of damage to the fields. The damage and loss of crops is a huge blow to farmers’ livelihoods, and as one would expect, this makes farmers very angry. This is where problems arise. To protect their land, farmers will take extreme measures to remove elephants from the area – while the methods may vary, this type of conflict can be very dangerous, and sometimes deadly for both elephants and people. So, how do we protect farmland and protect elephants so people and wildlife can live peacefully with one another? BEES!

Researchers in Kenya working with Save the Elephants were out in the field one day when they noticed that when elephants were around trees with large hives of bees, they would quickly move away. After years of testing and studying these interactions, it was discovered that just the sound of a buzzing beehive will keep elephants far away from an area. At this point researchers had a clever idea – by putting up a rope fence and hanging wooden boxes for beehives across them, farmers could successfully keep elephants away from their crops. Better yet, farmers could also collect the honey produced by the bees and use it for both food and as an extra source of income! A simple and genius solution that is a win-win for both humans and elephants.

Here at the Houston Zoo we help to support the Niassa Beehive Fence Project. Run by the Niassa Lion Project, their programs aim to show communities humane and positive ways to stop human-wildlife conflict. Each time you visit the zoo, you are helping to support projects like this one! We also have a model of one of these fences at the McNair Asian Elephant Habitat here at the zoo – check it out on your next visit! Just like the bees, our individual actions may seem small, but together we can make a mighty big impact – to learn more about what you can do to help save elephants in the wild, click here!

 

Elephant Population Increases on Island of Borneo

Our wildlife protection partners in Borneo have recently announced that the population of elephants has doubled over the past 10 years! Thanks to your visit to the Houston Zoo, we are able to send vital support to protect elephants in Borneo. We are extremely fortunate to have members of our extended zoo family working in Asia to ensure the survival of Bornean elephants. The Kinabatangan Elephant Conservation Unit (ECU) works with local communities in Borneo to raise awareness, improve human-wildlife relationships, and give farmers the tools and training they need for elephant-friendly crop protection. The Danau Girang Field Centre is conducting the first population biology study of the Bornean elephant, and as a part of this effort, the zoo is able to provide funding for: radio collars, camera traps, and graduate student scholarships.

Here at home we continue to promote these partnerships at our McNair Asian Elephant Habitat, giving our Houston community the opportunity to learn about our herd of elephants at the zoo, and their wild counterparts. To learn more about our partnerships and how you can help Bornean elephants on and off zoo grounds click here.

 

Female Baby Elephant “Joy” Born at the Houston Zoo

 

After a two-year pregnancy, the wait is over for Shanti (and all of Houston!). Yesterday at 8:27 p.m., the 26-year-old Asian elephant gave birth to a 305-pound female after a short labor, and the calf began to nurse within three hours. The calf has been named Joy by the team who have dedicated their lives to the care, well-being, and conservation of these incredible animals.

Baby elephants are quite wobbly when they’re first born, so the harness you see Joy wearing below lets our elephant team help her stand steady while she’s nursing.

Shanti gave birth in the McNair Asian Elephant Habitat cow barn under the supervision of her keepers and veterinary staff. She and the calf will undergo post-natal exams and spend several days bonding behind the scenes, before they are ready for their public debut. During the bonding period, the elephant team is watching for the pair to share several key moments like communicating with mom, and hitting weight goals.

“Our animal team is thrilled that the birth has gone smoothly,” said Lisa Marie Avendano, vice president of animal operations at the Houston Zoo. “We look forward to continuing to watch Joy and Shanti bond, and introducing her to Houston.”

This is an exhilarating summer for the elephant team. In May, the zoo opened an expanded elephant habitat which doubled the entire elephant complex and immerses guests into the lives and culture of Asian elephants. The new bull barn and expanded yard gives more room for this growing herd.

Just by visiting the Houston Zoo, guests help save baby elephants and their families in the wild. A portion of each zoo admission and membership goes straight to protecting an estimated 200-250 wild elephants in Asia. Since the Houston Zoo started its work in Borneo in 2007, there has been a doubling of the elephant population on the island. The Houston Zoo also provides funds for elephant conservationist, Nurzhafarina “Farina” Othman and her team in Asia, to put tracking collars on wild elephants. This group uses collars to follow wild elephants, conducting valuable research that aids in protecting the elephants as they travel through the forests. Farina also spends time working with farmers that grow and produce palm oil, offering her guidance in responsible cultivation practices that are wildlife-friendly.

Palm oil is an ingredient in many foods and cosmetics, typically grown in areas that were previously home to animals like wild elephants. Converting pristine forests into oil palm plantations has caused extensive deforestation across Southeast Asia.  Luckily, a growing number of producers are working to protect these areas and the animals that live there. The Houston Zoo encourages people to protect elephants in the wild by supporting companies that use responsibly sourced palm oil, increasing demand for palm oil that is grown and produced without destroying the forested homes of elephants.

Tons of Love Coming This Summer

Hope the storks have been working out, because a 250-to-300-pound bundle of joy is headed for the Houston Zoo! Shanti is pregnant and after a two-year gestation, the 26-year-old Asian elephant will give birth this summer.

Shanti is one of the Houston Zoo’s eight Asian elephants, and mother to youngest calf, Duncan (3) and Baylor (7). Zoo officials are optimistic that this pregnancy is advancing normally and on schedule. Shanti has received nearly two years of pre-natal care by the zoo’s elephant team and four veterinarians with regular ultrasounds and blood work.  The zoo team will continue to monitor Shanti as she progresses into the labor process, indicated by a hormonal change in her daily blood analysis.

Shanti will give birth in the McNair Asian Elephant Habitat cow barn under the supervision of her keepers and veterinary staff. After delivery, she and the calf will undergo post-natal exams and spend several days bonding behind the scenes. The elephant team looks forward to watching the pair share several key moments that will prepare them for their public debut. Nursing, communicating with mom, and hitting weight goals are important milestones for a growing baby elephant.

“All of our zoo staff looks forward to any baby born here,” said Lisa Marie Avendano, vice president of animal operations at the Houston Zoo. “But with the opening of our new elephant addition, this is a particularly exciting time to welcome a 250-to-300-pound Asian elephant calf into our zoo family. The beautifully designed expansion and our continued breeding program demonstrates the Houston Zoo’s commitment to the health and welfare of our herd and our mission to saving species in the wild.”

This is an exhilarating summer for the elephant team. In May, the zoo opened an expanded elephant habitat which doubled the entire elephant complex and immerses guests into the lives and culture of Asian elephants. The new bull barn and expanded yard gives more room for this growing herd.

Just by visiting the Houston Zoo, guests help save baby elephants and their families in the wild. A portion of each zoo admission and membership goes straight to protecting an estimated 200-250 wild e lephants in Asia. Since the Houston Zoo started its work in Borneo in 2007, there has been a doubling of the elephant population on the island. The Houston Zoo also provides funds for elephant conservationist, Nurzhafarina “Farina” Othman and her team in Asia, to put tracking collars on wild elephants. This group uses collars to follow wild elephants, conducting valuable research that aids in protecting the elephants as they travel through the forests. Farina also spends time working with farmers that grow and produce palm oil, offering her guidance in responsible cultivation practices that are wildlife-friendly.

Palm oil is an ingredient in many foods and cosmetics, typically grown in areas that were previously home to animals like wild elephants. Converting pristine forests into oil palm plantations has caused extensive deforestation across Southeast Asia.  Luckily, a growing number of producers are working to protect these areas and the animals that live there. The Houston Zoo encourages people to protect elephants in the wild by supporting companies that use responsibly sourced palm oil, increasing demand for palm oil that is grown and produced without destroying the forested homes of elephants.

Help Save Elephants in the Wild and Wear Gray for World Elephant Day!

tupelo-tess-elephant-slider

Calling all elephant enthusiasts! Did you know elephant population numbers are rapidly declining in the wild? Do you know there are ways YOU can help protect these magnificent animals in the wild? You can start by joining the more than one hundred zoos and thousands of individuals across the country on Friday, August 12 in celebrating World Elephant Day! Guests that wear gray to the zoo will have a chance to win fun door prizes.

Elephants are the largest land mammals in the world and among the most intelligent animals on earth. Unfortunately, Asian elephants are also among the world’s most endangered species. At the turn of the 20th century, more than 100,000 Asian elephants roamed their native habitat. Today, approximately 40,000 Asian elephants remain in the wild. And this number continues to decline due to habitat loss, human-elephant conflict and poaching for their ivory tusks.

Here at the Houston Zoo, we are committed to protecting animals outside of our Zoo gates, and elephants are in serious need of our support. In the past five years, the Houston Zoo has worked closely with partners in both Africa and Asia, funding over $500,000 in field conservation programs.

YOU can help, too! Simply by visiting the Houston Zoo, you help protect animals in the wild – a portion of your admission ticket goes directly to conservation efforts around the world. You can also attend special events throughout the year, such as our Elephant Open House that will be held September 17, 2016 from 8 am – 10:30 am, where registration fees are also donated to conservation efforts.

elephants-outside-playing

A great time to visit the Houston Zoo is World Elephant Day on Friday, August 12, 2016.

World Elephant Day Activities Include:

11 a.m. – 2 p.m.

Find out more about the Houston Zoo’s Asian elephant herd: Thai, Methai, Shanti, Tess, Tucker, Tupelo, Baylor & Duncan

Help keepers decorate enrichment items to give to the elephants throughout the day.

See and have a chance to purchase artwork done by our Pachyderm Picassos!

Learn all about elephant conservation and what YOU can do to help save them in the wild.

Wear gray on your Zoo visit to show your support plus talk with our Zookeepers, while the elephants are outside playing in the yard.

Elephant Keeper Kim Klein Travels to Laos

By: Kim Klein

A-E3After three long flights totaling 23 hours and a 12 hour layover, the enrichment supplies and I arrived in Laos! Biologist Anabel and Marketing director Jozef, eagerly awaiting my arrival, picked me up at the airport in Vientiane. Our first stop was for pizza. From there, we had a 6 hour van ride and a short boat ride to the Elephant Conservation Center located along the Nam Tien Lake in Sayaboury. Of course, we spent most of the ride talking about ELEPHANTS!

When we arrived at the center, it was afternoon and the resident elephants were bathing in the river. I met and observed several of the rescued elephants, watched them participate in target training, and visited the on-site hospital. Anabel introduced me to the Mahouts and other staff; we visited the enrichment yard and the new 1.5 acre socialization area. Diving into the purpose of my trip, Anabel and I discussed what types of enrichment the center uses and what supplies we had collectively gathered to make new enrichment items including barrels, fire hose, rope, tires, and balls. I was also informed about the individual elephant’s personalities and with this information we devised a plan of action!A-E1


Each day, I had several people assist me in creating and dispersing enrichment items. The Center’s staff and volunteers would gather together and get to work building puzzle feeders out of recycled barrels, elephant sized balls using fire hose and recycled tires, chimes made of bamboo, and rattle bags. Once the enrichment was ready to go, the Center’s guests would trek with us to the enrichment yard to help us fill up the feeders and spread out the new toys. From the enrichment workshop to the elephant yard, we had to climb through the forest and over hills. Carrying the new toys, this sometimes took us more than 20 minutes! Over the course of my two week trip, with the help of staff and several volunteers, we created 15 novel enrichment items for the center’s 7 elephants!

A-E2In our next blog, we will talk about how excited the elephants were when they encountered their new enrichment items!

Houston Zoo’s Dr Lauren Travels to Singapore to Save Elephants – Post # 6

One of our expert veterinarians is currently in Singapore working with other wildlife professionals to save elephants from a deadly virus. Embark on this journey with her as she writes about the efforts being made to eradicate the virus and protect Asian elephants around the world.


The hotel on the left is the Marina Bay Sands Hotel, check it out. Yes thats a boat on toop of three buildings. Makes the theatre in the middle that looks likea blooming onion look boringWith almost 6 million people, Singapore is one of the world’s smallest countries. That said, it has four official languages, six digit zip codes, and has transformed itself from a “third-world, mosquito infested swamp” to modern, vibrant city in less than 50 years.  The architecture and ambiance struck me as a cross between New York City and Las Vegas, with an added emphasis on green spaces and ecologically responsible design. Minus the litter, panhandlers, and chewing gum encrusted on the sidewalks, of course. (Chewing gum, and littering, are punishable offenses here). Today was our one day off from the workshops to see a bit of the city, and I got a chance to look around with Dr. Paul Ling, of the Baylor College of Medicine. If you want to see an absolutely crazy building, check out the Marina Bay Sands Hotel of Singapore, which looks like three hotels with a boat on top of them.

Dr. Ling and I have traveled to Singapore to participate in the 1st Asian EEHV Strategy Meeting, a three-day workshop hosted by Wildlife Reserves Singapore and including 38 people from 8 Asian elephant range countries as well as Singapore, Europe, Canada and the US. Together we are sharing information on EEHV (elephant endotheliotropic herpesvirus), a deadly virus that can cause acute, often fatal hemorrhagic disease in young Asian elephants, both under human care and in the wild. The Houston Zoo and Baylor College of Medicine have worked together on extensive research on this virus, and it was our privilege to take what we’ve learned in North America and use the information to help veterinarians detect and treat EEHV in Asian elephants throughout their 13 native range countries.

As we wrapped up our EEHV Meeting, the work of some of our new friends was just beginning as they started a two day meeting on the 2nd ASEAN Captive Elephant Working Group Meeting. I was able to sit in on one day of their discussion, where they focused on captive elephant care in elephant camps throughout Asia. There are many elephant camps that welcome tourists in Thailand and other Asian countries, and the quality of elephant care in these camps can vary greatly. It is the daunting task of this group to establish some guidelines, and possibly even a scoring or accreditation system similar to the AZA, for these camps. This would allow for more regular veterinary care of the elephants, improved living conditions for elephants and their caretakers, and will give well-meaning tourists the information they need to support the camps that do best by their animals.1st Asian EEHV Strategy Meeting Delegates 11.5.15

Whether you are traveling 20 hours by plane to Asia or just as far as Hermann Park in Houston, there is a lot you can do to help save animals in the wild, and to contribute to Asian elephant health and conservation. Every time you visit the Houston Zoo, your money helps to save animals in the wild. If you’d like to learn more about elephants and EEHV, the virus that has claimed the lives of almost half the Asian elephants that have been born in North America since 1980, please visit our www.eehvinfo.org. The critical, lifesaving research we do to better understand and manage EEHV would not be possible without financial support from people like you, who love elephants just as much as we do.Dr. Dennis Schmitt of Ringling Bros Center for Elephant Conservation examines the map of the 62 EEHV cases identified so far in Asia

It was a great opportunity for me to travel on behalf of the Houston Zoo and share all of our hard won information on EEHV with my new friends and colleagues from Singapore, Thailand, Myanmar, Malaysia, Sri Lanka, India, Cambodia, Borneo, and Vietnam. It’s not often you get to participate in a meeting where you really feel like your presence made a big difference, and I am grateful for the chance to experience that! Many people might assume that anyone who works at a zoo travels to far away, exotic places all the time, and some of us do. It’s just usually not me. With two small children I adore and a husband I never see enough of, the most exotic travel I usually do for conservation is to get out to Bastrop State Park once a year to participate in egg releases for our critically endangered Houston toad program. Becoming involved in EEHV collaboration and research has given me the opportunity to see some pretty incredible places and meet some amazing people, and also to stretch my wings and try my hand at new skills such as facilitation, consensus building, and even blogging! It just goes to show that you never know where a career in veterinary medicine may take you, or what you may end up dedicating your life to. I consider myself very lucky to be able to call the Houston Zoo, with its focus on conservation and science, home!

Houston Zoo’s Dr Lauren Travels to Singapore to Save Elephants – Post # 5

One of our expert veterinarians is currently in Singapore working with other wildlife professionals to save elephants from a deadly virus. Embark on this journey with her as she writes about the efforts being made to eradicate the virus and protect Asian elephants around the world.


They put me to work right away helping to facilitate discussionsWildlife Reserves Singapore consists of four separate animal parks: the Singapore Zoo, Singapore Night Safari, Singapore River Safari, and the Jurong Bird Park. The Singapore Zoo has an enormous Orangutan exhibit that houses 27 individuals in an amazing tree top exhibit.  The Night Safari is open only in the evening and focuses on nocturnal animals (and has a delicious dinner buffet to boot!). The Jurong Bird Park contains a massive enclosed aviary with a breathtaking waterfall that falls over a natural cliff around which the park was built. Wildlife Reserves Singapore is hosting our 1st Asian EEHV Strategy Meeting and funded the travel for many wildlife veterinarians and researchers from Asian elephant range countries so that they can attend this important first step in understanding EEHV’s impact in this region. My travel was funded by the Houston Zoo, as part of our ongoing effort to understand EEHV and also to share information and encourage international collaboration.

We learned yesterday that elephant deaths from EEHV (elephant endotheliotropic herpesvirus) have been identified in five Asian elephant range countries (India, Thailand, Cambodia, Indonesia, and Myanmar). Our task now is to clarify our next steps in both sharing what we know about EEHV with those that need to know it, and also in learning what we can about the impact of EEHV in this part of the world.The Jurong Bird Park has an amazing collection of birds and aviary surrounding this enormous waterfall, which falls over a natural cliff on which the park is built

Many veterinarians I met are just like my colleagues and I at the Houston Zoo, providing medical care for baby elephants under human care and wanting to do whatever they can to increase their chances of survival.  Some of these veterinarians live onsite with the elephants and have access to diagnostic laboratories and a wide range of veterinary drugs, and some of these vets take a whole day’s travel to even get to the baby elephants, and then make it only if the bridges aren’t out. Some of these elephants are in complex, highly regulated logging camps where their hours worked and medical care are carefully monitored, and some elephants are privately owned and live and work in small camps or with mahout families. Many vets also provide veterinary care and post mortem examinations on wild elephants, and help to care for wild elephants that come into conflict with humans on the border of human/elephant habitats.

The Singapore Zoo has two large male Asian elephants, a father and son, who live together in one exhibit.
There is much to learn about EEHV in wild elephants, and this is the hardest population of elephants to monitor and to determine numbers of and causes of death for. Mapping out the impact of a disease like EEHV on free ranging elephant populations across South Asia requires a well-organized effort and a long term commitment to sample collection and population monitoring. And we are just beginning.

Veterinarians from Thailand and India cast their votes for the most pressing issues regarding EEHV in Asia
Veterinarians from Thailand and India cast their votes for the most pressing issues regarding EEHV in Asia

Today our group identified several documents that we can put together to guide local veterinarians, mahouts and government officials, which we will complete by the end of 2015 and be ready to share by Feb 2016. These documents will be compiled into an EEHV in Asia Strategy Booklet, and will be the basis for the next steps we’ll take in tackling EEHV in this region. Our first step is to get everyone up to speed on what EEHV is, and how to recognize it, and, for those that are able, how to treat it. While we are doing that, we’ll also be encouraging veterinarians to document cases, collect data and start banking samples on captive and wild elephants whenever possible. Next we need to identify resources with which we can help to set up diagnostic laboratories in the countries that really need them, such as Cambodia, Myanmar, Laos, Malaysia, and others. We’ll be meeting again in Nov 2016 to gauge our progress and make the next set of plans.

Stay tuned for one more blog about Singapore and about what you can do to help elephants!!

Houston Zoo’s Dr Lauren Travels to Singapore to Save Elephants – Post # 4

One of our expert veterinarians is currently in Singapore working with other wildlife professionals to save elephants from a deadly virus. Embark on this journey with her as she writes about the efforts being made to eradicate the virus and protect Asian elephants around the world.


Friday night in hotel room after meeting:

Elephant endotheliotropic herpesvirus (EEHV) is responsible for 42% of the deaths of Asian elephants born in North America since 1980. It is certainly a leading cause of mortality in the young Asian elephants in our country, and better understanding of this devastating disease is a high priority for the research collaboration established between the Houston Zoo and Baylor College of Medicine. What does EEHV mean for Asian elephants in their 13 range countries across South Asia? Does it impact elephants that are under human care in camps, orphanages, zoos, and logging operations? Does it impact free ranging Asian elephant populations, which are already under immense pressure from habitat destruction and fragmentation, human elephant conflict, and poaching?

Elephant Mating

Today we took the first steps to finding answers to some of these questions. Today was the second day of our three day 1st Asian EEHV Strategy Meeting, hosted by Wildlife Reserves Singapore. Thirty three veterinarians, conservationists, researchers and elephant specialists from eight elephant range countries as well as Singapore, the Netherlands, Canada and the US came together to share information and discuss priorities and plan our next steps in regard to EEHV in Asia. The largest regional need identified was the need to increase awareness and education about EEHV in all groups including  those taking care of the elephants every day (the mahouts) as well as elephant and wildlife veterinarians, veterinary colleges, and government officials. Another important issue identified was the need to establish more laboratories that can diagnose EEHV within range countries;  currently, of 13 elephant range countries, only 3 have EEHV diagnostic capabilities (India, Thailand, and Indonesia). EEHV can cause death within 1 to 2 days of the start of visible illness, making close availability of diagnostic laboratories of paramount importance.Asian Elephant Baylor-0489-1886

A third priority identified was the need to learn more about the impact of EEHV on Asian elephant populations in range countries. Together, we identified 62 cases of EEHV in five of the range countries represented at our meeting (India, Myanmar, Indonesia, Thailand, and Cambodia), with 3 of these 62 elephants surviving infection with intensive treatment by Thai veterinarians. Of the 59 identified EEHV fatalities, 47 were in captive elephants and 12 were documented in wild elephants in India, where wildlife veterinarians already have an extensive monitoring and necropsy protocol. We now know for certain that EEHV-associated mortalities occur in wild elephants, and need to learn much more about its prevalence in and impact on wild populations.

It was a long day and long laundry list of needs and problems to address…. Wherever do we start…. Stay tuned next time for the answers! (well, at least some of them…..)

Houston Zoo’s Dr Lauren Travels to Singapore to Save Elephants – Post # 3

One of our expert veterinarians is currently in Singapore working with other wildlife professionals to save elephants from a deadly virus. Embark on this journey with her as she writes about the efforts being made to eradicate the virus and protect Asian elephants around the world.


Here I am sharing the results of one of our smaller group discussions, where we itemized several things that need to get done

(In cab on way back from Singapore Night Safari):

Today I got to stand up in front of a crowd of 50 people from 10 different countries in Asia and explain how we have saved elephants from EEHV at the Houston Zoo. Veterinarians from Thailand, Vietnam, Cambodia, Indonesia, Myanmar, Malaysia, India, Borneo, Singapore, and Sri Lanka attended the first day of our three  day workshop on the Asian EEHV Strategy meeting hosted by the Singapore Zoo. As I’ve mentioned earlier, elephant endotheliotropic herpesvirus (EEHV) causes severe, fatal hemorrhagic disease in young Asian elephants. Today I presented background information on EEHV as well as details of the Houston Zoo’s intensive EEHV monitoring and treatment program. I presented along with Dr. Paul Ling of Houston’s Baylor College of Medicine, Dr. Willem Schaftenaar of the Rotterdam Zoo in the Netherlands, and Dr. Arun Zachariah of the department of Forest and Wildlife in Kerala,  India. We also heard case reports and field updates from Dr. Christopher Stremme in Indonesia, and  Dr. Chatchote Thitaram, from the Center of Excellence in Elephant Research and Education in Thailand. I learned that our Houston Zoo EEHV Protocol, which we update yearly, was used as an important resource at the First Meeting of the Thailand EEHV Task Force in October 2015. The treatment information in our protocol also contributed significantly to the survival of three young elephants in Thailand who became ill from EEHV in 2013-2015. Unfortunately, these survivors were in the minority, with 25 elephants in Thailand having died of EEHV since 2006, with more than half of the fatalities occurring since 2012.Dr. Ellen Wiedner shares information with range country veterinarians on elephant ICU care and elephant blood cells

In North America, most of the institutions that care for elephants have the same challenges and priorities, intensively managing smaller herds and focusing EEHV monitoring efforts on a handful of young elephants in their collections. Throughout these different countries in South East Asia, the situations and needs vary greatly from region to region. Some elephant camps or sanctuaries have full time veterinarians, and some have veterinarians visit regularly or only when an illness is noted. The logging elephants in Myanmar have strict government guidelines outlining their care.  The Elephant Transit Camp in Sri Lanka houses up to forty elephant orphans under 6 years old, eventually rehabilitating most and releasing them back the wild. The challenge we will face the next two days will be to take what we have learned about EEHV in North America, and the testing and treatment protocols we have developed at the Houston Zoo, and see how we can apply this all to the various situations across Asia, where an elephant’s blood sample may travel for three days at room temperature before it can make it to a lab, and where electricity to keep refrigerators working is not always reliable. It’s a thrill being able to share information from our EEHV Collaboration in Houston with these incredible veterinarians who face so many challenges (habitat destruction, fragmenting of wild herds, lack laboratories)  in the work of keeping their elephants safe and healthy. More to come!!

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Today, we are working with BBVA Compass Stadium to plant a new pollinator garden at the stadium! This beautiful new pollinator garden supports local pollinators like bees, butterflies, and more, and is located at the North entrance to BBVA Compass Stadium. Great partnership for an even greater good. ... See MoreSee Less

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