SMG’s Borneo Travel Log, Thursday

Thursday: We are finishing up our time here in Borneo. This afternoon, we went for a boat ride to visit a tree planting project run by Hutan. It’s an all female run project and these women are doing great work to reforest a large tract of land that was previously clear-cut but a palm oil plantation. In the evening we toured a small tributary to survey wildlife and we came across a family of long-tailed macaques that were eating on a branch overhanging the water. We stopped to enjoy the view for a bit and then headed back around sunset.

Houston Zoo’s SMG (Social Media Guy) is on the trip of a lifetime to Borneo!

From Dec. 1–11, 2017 the Houston Zoo and Houston’s KPRC Channel 2 are traveling to southeast Asia and the island of Borneo to document the work you are supporting to protect the counterparts of the wildlife that you see when you visit the Zoo. Houston Zoo conservation associates who have dedicated their careers to protecting elephants, orangutans, pangolins and a whole host of other amazing species on the world’s third largest island will give us an in-depth look at what it means to save species from extinction.

We’ve created a special webpage to follow their exciting journey around the world, go behind the scenes, and learn more about how we can all save animals in the wild. Follow along with SMG!

SMG’s Borneo Travel Log, Wednesday

Wednesday Morning and Afternoon: Today we set out for a long trek through the jungle. Nurzhfarina “Farina” Othman, Houston Zoo Conservation Associate, updated us on the latest positions of the elephants and we hopped back in for another long boat ride down river. When we got close to the spot where the last satellite position was, Farina switched over to the radio telemetry tracker to listen for beeps. After that, it’s into the jungle. Our guide Coco led us in and we began bushwacking through some of the thickest forest I’ve ever been in. We continued for about two hours this way, only pausing to take water breaks and listen to the radio signal. We could hear the elephants as we got close and it was an eerie sound to hear when you can’t see them. As we got closer and closer to the signal, Farina tells us that only two of us can go up with her at a time because the elephants aren’t very happy we have been following them. We sent our camera man up, and I followed behind him. We were crawling on the ground to minimize our noise and slow us down and then….a trunk. Elephants. I can’t believe how easily they can move through this dense forest that we had been tripping on all morning.  We  spend just a few moments with the elephants before we have to head back and start our return walk to the boat. We started at 8 a.m. and we arrive to the boat at 2:15 p.m., completely exhausted and wiped out but happy we have seen the incredible Bornean elephant.

Houston Zoo’s SMG (Social Media Guy) is on the trip of a lifetime to Borneo!

From Dec. 1–11, 2017 the Houston Zoo and Houston’s KPRC Channel 2 are traveling to southeast Asia and the island of Borneo to document the work you are supporting to protect the counterparts of the wildlife that you see when you visit the Zoo. Houston Zoo conservation associates who have dedicated their careers to protecting elephants, orangutans, pangolins and a whole host of other amazing species on the world’s third largest island will give us an in-depth look at what it means to save species from extinction.

We’ve created a special webpage to follow their exciting journey around the world, go behind the scenes, and learn more about how we can all save animals in the wild. Follow along with SMG!

Christmas Shopping in the Naturally Wild Swap Shop

Ah, November. Cooler weather coming in, pumpkin spice everything and dreams of turkey and dressing.

Of course, you know what that means………CHRISTMAS IS COMING!!   It’s time to start thinking about travel plans, gift lists, family outings and more.

Not only are the adults among us thinking in terms of gift buying, but the kids are too. That might cause an issue.  Unless your kiddo has saved allowance and birthday money since he or she was born, they may not have a lot of resources.

We have an alternative. They can shop in the Naturally Wild Swap Shop and they won’t need cash!

How? The Naturally Wild Swap Shop is designed for people of all ages to bring in things they find in nature.  They can bring rocks, minerals, fossils and shells among other things. (click the link below for more information)  As many as three things per person can be brought in a day.  These items will earn points based on how unusual they are and what condition they are in.  Knowledge points can also be earned if they can tell us about their item.  When you trade, you can also earn extra points for having items from our Take Action list.  That includes reusable bottles and bags, pictures of recycling, sustainable seafood and more.  Then, those points can be spent in the shop!

What kinds of things can you get with your points? There is a lot to choose from!  Rocks, minerals, shells, even cut gemstones.  The shop has items ranging from 5 points to 50,000 points so there is something for the spender and the saver alike.

In the rock and mineral section, you might like the geodes or the rose quartz. If mom or dad is a fossil fan, the kids might want to get them an ammonite or a fossil sea biscuit.  There are shells in a multitude of colors, shapes and sizes for them to pick out someone’s favorite color shell as a gift.  For those who have saved up some points, we even have cut gemstones in amethyst, aquamarine, citrine and more.

While trading is now open to all ages, the younger of our traders may be more likely to want to shop with points to make their holidays merry. We hope to see you in the shop soon.

Don’t know about the Naturally Wild Swap Shop? Click here for more information.

SMG’s Borneo Travel Log, Tuesday

Tuesday Morning: We woke up to the indescribable sound of rain in the jungle. It’s almost magical. While eating breakfast, our group discussed how we planned to track elephants for the day. Suddenly, one of the students working here comes running down the path yelling, “CROCODILE!” A croc had been caught in one of the traps we set on Monday. The entire field centre started moving. The plan had been for the crocodile researchers to head out early in the morning to check the traps, if they had caught a croc, they’d send word back and wait until the group of research assistants and field guides could join. We dropped what we were doing and set out with the team moving in on the trapped croc. As we got closed, we saw him – Inside a 12′ trap was what turned out to be a 14′ crocodile. It was not tiny. It was impressive to watch the research assistants work. They moved the trap to the shore, and began to tie ropes around the croc’s snout. The researchers inserted a microchip (similar to how you’d microchip your pet), took a tissue sample, and affixed a satellite tracker. After about an hour on land, the group of muddy researchers and field assistants released the massive crocodile back into the river.

The crocodile work closely with our partners.  All of the conservation projects in the area benefit from one another’s information and efforts to protect all of the wildlife in Borneo!

Tuesday Afternoon: Heading out with Houston Zoo Conservation Associate, Farina at 1:00 p.m. We’re planning to trek into the jungle in search of elephants. Wish us luck!

Tuesday Afternoon, Continued: We went out with Farinha to look for elephants after getting a good GPS location. After a 45min boat ride, we got out and began trekking through the jungle. After a short walk, we realized that the elephants were on the other side of an impassible swamp and had to turn around for the day. It was a bummer but we are going to try around tomorrow.

Houston Zoo’s SMG (Social Media Guy) is on the trip of a lifetime to Borneo!

From Dec. 1–11, 2017 the Houston Zoo and Houston’s KPRC Channel 2 are traveling to southeast Asia and the island of Borneo to document the work you are supporting to protect the counterparts of the wildlife that you see when you visit the Zoo. Houston Zoo conservation associates who have dedicated their careers to protecting elephants, orangutans, pangolins and a whole host of other amazing species on the world’s third largest island will give us an in-depth look at what it means to save species from extinction.

We’ve created a special webpage to follow their exciting journey around the world, go behind the scenes, and learn more about how we can all save animals in the wild. Follow along with SMG!

December’s Featured Members: The Pollock Family

We love our Members. Their incredible support allows us to make a difference to animals both locally and all over the world. This month, we’re spotlighting a family of Zoo Members that deserve recognition. We’re thrilled to introduce you to December’s Featured Members: The Pollock Family

We truly cherish being zoo members! Our boys are now 8 and 10, and they have grown up visiting the zoo. When we travel, we also go to other zoos, which keeps reminding us how amazing our zoo is here is Houston!

Just a couple of monkeys watching some primates.

The whole family feels like a part of the Houston Zoo community. And it truly feels like a community. Our boys have always wanted to get up close and involved with the animals. Through the Adopt and Animal program, we were able to create a shared experience with their cousins (who live near Washington D.C. and are also passionate about animals). When the cousins come to town, all of the kids insist on going to the zoo to visit “their animals”. Additionally, we were thrilled when we learned that our next-door neighbor was a zoo volunteer. When she shared that elephants love to eat kumquats and asked if we would be willing to allow her to gather some from our own backyard tree, we jumped at the chance to be a part of feeding the elephants. When we see the orange-colored peels on the ground, there is a sense of excitement that those are our fruits!

Then, there is zoo camp. Our boys LOVE zoo camp. It has taught them so much about animals, the environment, our impact on and inclusion in the animal kingdom, as well as giving direct, hands-on experiences that extend beyond what we ever expected. To say that we (their parents) are envious of everything they get to do and experience while at camp would seriously be a huge understatement!

 

Perhaps most importantly for our family, the Houston Zoo absolutely allows for and encourages a diversity of experiences that provides the chance to feel close to the animals. Our family absolutely feels personally involved and invested in the zoo and the animals. This investment is not just at the zoo, but extends to all animals worldwide. We are so grateful to have this experience so close to home and to be able to participate in an affordable, quality experience. From the habitat-style spaces, to viewing windows, keeper talks, education and enrichment programs, and the interaction opportunities (holy moly is it fun to feed a giraffe!), the Houston Zoo creates a world-class, inclusive environment that seems uniquely its own. We are so proud to call it ours!

From all of us here at the Houston Zoo, we want to say thank you to the Buchanan’s and all of our Zoo Members. As a Houston Zoo Member, your support truly makes an impact on the growth of our Zoo and conservation efforts. THANKS!

SMG’s Borneo Travel Log, Monday

Monday morning: We started the morning with a group of researchers collecting data on crocodiles. Crocodiles here get BIG, like BIGGGGG. We loaded up two gigantic crocodile traps and headed out in the boats to set them. The boat ride in the daytime was beautiful, and much less stressful than last night. KPRC team interviewed the group setting the traps and we asked why it was important to collect this data. The researcher explained that she wants to know how the crocs are moving and start to assess how people affect their movement and behavior in the Kinabatangan.

Monday Afternoon: In the afternoon, we met up with Farinha and set out to see if we could find an elephant herd she has been tracking. After getting the last GPS coordinates, we took a 45 minute boat ride down-river and then tried to get radio telemetry “beeps.” We knew the elephants were inside the forest and not on the edge of the river, but since it was late in the day and the sun was going down, we decided not to leave the river. We headed back to the field centre and had dinner.

 

Monday Night: After dinner, we packed our expedition bags up and head out with python researcher, Rich, to look for pythons. Rich is studying important characteristics such as how pythons move through their habitat, if there are any influencing factors as to where pythons may be located, as well as parasites that the pythons may be carrying. During our dark ride down the river at night, Rich explains that to catch a python, he spots it with a headlamp, points the boat towards it, and then jumps off the boat to catch it….with his hands. Bare hands. Reading it might sound interesting but watching a person jump off a boat to grab a wild python is incredible. With a python in hand, Rich places it in a snake bag which he’ll transfer to a special container when we get back. On Tuesday morning, he plans to measure and collect all the data he needs to continue his research.

The crocodile and python researchers work closely with our partners.  All of the conservation projects in the area benefit from one another’s information and efforts to protect all of the wildlife in Borneo!

Houston Zoo’s SMG (Social Media Guy) is on the trip of a lifetime to Borneo!

From Dec. 1–11, 2017 the Houston Zoo and Houston’s KPRC Channel 2 are traveling to southeast Asia and the island of Borneo to document the work you are supporting to protect the counterparts of the wildlife that you see when you visit the Zoo. Houston Zoo conservation associates who have dedicated their careers to protecting elephants, orangutans, pangolins and a whole host of other amazing species on the world’s third largest island will give us an in-depth look at what it means to save species from extinction.

We’ve created a special webpage to follow their exciting journey around the world, go behind the scenes, and learn more about how we can all save animals in the wild. Follow along with SMG!

SMG’s Borneo Travel Log, Sunday

Houston Zoo’s SMG (Social Media Guy) is on the trip of a lifetime to Borneo!

From Dec. 1–11, 2017 the Houston Zoo and Houston’s KPRC Channel 2 are traveling to southeast Asia and the island of Borneo to document the work you are supporting to protect the counterparts of the wildlife that you see when you visit the Zoo. Houston Zoo conservation associates who have dedicated their careers to protecting elephants, orangutans, pangolins and a whole host of other amazing species on the world’s third largest island will give us an in-depth look at what it means to save species from extinction. 

Here is some reporting from the field:

Sunday afternoon: After four flights and days of travel, we arrived in Sandakan and met the team that would take us to the field centre. We got in a van and drove two hours to a dock where we loaded everything on boats and started on our boat trip down river to DGFC.

 

Sunday night: The sun had set as we started our boat ride, which was supposed to take about 30 minutes. As the moon rose over the jungle, we noticed our feet were wet. Water in the boat. Our boat driver stopped a few times to scoop water out of the boat but as soon as we started driving again water was filling up the boat. While I was pretty confident everything was going to be fine, for a moment, I was overtaken with the thought of swimming through a river infested with crocodiles in the pitch black night. To be sure that didn’t happen, I volunteer to bail water out of boat so our driver could continue down the river. I’m happy to say we made it safely and we were happy to be on dry land. We settled into our rooms and quickly fell asleep, happy to be done moving.

 

We’ve created a special webpage to follow their exciting journey around the world, go behind the scenes, and learn more about how we can all save animals in the wild. Follow along with SMG!

 

Give the Gift of the Photo Ark this Holiday Season

If you’re searching for the perfect holiday gift to give this season, kids and adults of all ages will fall in love with The Photo Ark: One Man’s Quest to Document the World’s Animals by National Geographic photographer Joel Sartore. Not only is this book a stunning collection of over 6,000 species marking the halfway point for Joel’s project, but it also includes animals from right here at the Houston Zoo!

In addition, Chris Holmes, Houston Zoo Assistant Curator of Birds, is featured in this book as a conservation hero for his work with critically endangered blue-billed curassows. Unique to Colombia, there are only a few hundred of these birds left in the wild due to habitat destruction and hunting. One way to make sure blue-billed curassows don’t go extinct is to make sure this species and its’ genetic diversity is represented in zoos. This ensures that if there are any major decreases in the wild, there is a genetically diverse population that could possibly be released to boost wild populations. Chris, using his unique skills developed with the Houston Zoo’s blue-billed curassows, partnered with the Colombian Zoo Association to save these birds in the wild through sharing knowledge gained from successful breeding efforts, providing the resources needed for a successful breeding program in-country, and collaborating in the creation of a five-year conservation plan. In January 2014, the National Aviary of Colombia became the first Colombian zoo to breed the blue-billed curassow in its native Colombia.

The Photo Ark project adds a creative twist to the world of wildlife conservation, using striking studio portraits of animals as a way connect people to wildlife and, in turn, inspire them to take action to save the animals we share the planet with. By using black and white backgrounds, all species – big and small, become equals, reminding us that each of these creatures have a voice, and a vital role to play in keeping our planet healthy for future generations.

Joel Sartore, the creator of the Photo Ark, is a longtime friend of the Houston Zoo, having photographed here many times in the past, and speaking at the zoo’s conservation gala back in 2016. We are proud to partner with Joel, and the feeling is mutual –

“Having friends in the world of zoos is critical in building the Photo Ark, and Chris Holmes is a perfect example of this. He’s worked for years with birds, especially in Columbia. People trust him, and his expertise, honed over years of hard work. With his recommendation, this allows me to work literally anywhere that he has established relationships. It’s remarkable and so appreciated. Indeed, without good references from folks like Chris, the Ark simply would not be able to proceed.” – Joel Sartore

Stop by the gift shop on your next visit to the zoo to pick up your copy! To explore the Ark and learn more about this incredible 25-year project, click here.

Supporting Wildlife with the Houston Zoo

The Houston Zoo and Houston’s KPRC Channel 2 are headed to southeast Asia and the island of Borneo to document the work of our conservation associates who have dedicated their careers to protecting elephants, orangutans, pangolins and a whole host of other amazing species on the world’s third largest island.

But how did we get here, and I do not mean the 30+ hours on multiple flights, a short drive by car and then boat ride to the field centre. I am the Houston Zoo’s Vice-President of Wildlife Conservation and Conservation Education and have been working with partners and traveling to Borneo since 2005 for the Houston Zoo.

In 2017, we began to roll out our new mission of connecting communities with animals, inspiring action to save wildlife. That has a double meaning for me. When we say connecting communities we mean you, our guests and followers – the over 2.4million of you that come through our gates every year. In Borneo, it means connecting those communities with animals that many times are literally living in their backyards and have always been a part of their lives. Whether it is otter, a crocodile, turtles in the river, an orangutan overhead or an elephant at their doorstep, we strive to find solutions to reduce potential conflict between the wildlife and local communities.

In that decade plus period from our first trip to Borneo supporting orangutan conservation with a group called Hutan-Kinabatangan Orangutan Conservation Project, our Houston Zoo program has grown and with it the number of programs we support in Borneo. Islands are very special places. Some hold an amazing array of biodiversity with species found nowhere else in the world. Places like Borneo, Galapagos and Madagascar are great examples of this. Since our first trip in 2005, we have expanded our conservation associates to include not only orangutans, but elephants and pangolins as well.

And how did I get here? It is a 30-year story from zookeeper to supervisor to conservation and a multitude of other roles and responsibilities along the way, a large part of which is here at the Houston Zoo beginning in 2004. I have a special interest in wildlife that many people do not concern themselves with including small mammals such as rodents, insectivores and bats. I consider them the unappreciated mega-charismatic micro-vertebrates of the wildlife world. How could you look at a Philippines Cloud Rat, Haitian Solenodon, Elephant shrew, Streaked Tenrec or Damaraland Mole Rat and not fall in love with those beady eyes and cute faces? If you are herp or bird person, calm down, I adore Kenyan Sand Boas, Painted Batagur Turtles and Curassows just the same.

I would say Borneo is one of my favorite places we work and that would be a semi-truth as all the places we work, be it northern Mozambique with lions or Rwanda’s Mountain Gorillas or Brazil’s Pantanal are my favorite places to work

Coming back to Borneo every few years is like visiting old friends and co-workers. The islands landscape continues to evolve and change and the conservation work is ongoing and increasing from year to year. Wildlife is getting squeezed between remnants of forest in one area while a small reforestation project pops up in another. And while all these changes occur, the dedication of the people and their work ethic to protect wildlife here is always amazing to see.

Learn more!

Christmas Treecycling

Written by Amber Zelmer


Now that we have stuffed ourselves silly for Thanksgiving, people are putting up their Christmas decorations & getting into the holiday spirit! Many people might be wondering whether to choose a real or artificial tree for their household this year. You may be surprised to learn that using a real Christmas tree can be a better choice for the environment than an artificial tree!

The benefit of artificial trees, is that they don’t need to be watered and are able to be reused year after year. However, most artificial trees are used for less than 4 years before they are thrown out. There are almost no facilities that recycle artificial trees and they can take up to 500 years to break down in a landfill! Most artificial trees are manufactured overseas in China or Korea & must be shipped for sale here in the U.S. According to Audubon magazine, you would have to keep an artificial tree for at least 20 years before it would be a better alternative than the real deal.

Christmas tree farms in the U.S. are a more sustainable source for your holiday tree. It can take a pine tree around 7 years to grow to a harvestable size. During the time it is growing, the tree is providing a habitat for migratory birds & other native wildlife. These trees are also producing oxygen & sequestering carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.

If you are wondering how to dispose of your natural Christmas tree after the holidays there are many ways that you can use the tree to keep benefitting the environment! Many communities offer drop off sites for your old trees & may use them to help prevent erosion by creating barriers along beaches to help preserve sand dunes. The City of Houston offers an annual Christmas tree recycling program and will pick up trees and turn them into mulch or, if you have the space, you can mulch it yourself and use it in your garden or landscaping. Make sure to check online to see which day your neighborhood is collecting trees for the program. When recycling your tree, you must remove all ornaments, decorations, lights, tinsel & tree stands; flocked trees cannot be recycled. If you are not a resident of Houston proper, be sure to check online for local sites that are participating in tree recycling programs or repurposing used trees.

This holiday season we can all be a little more green!

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Houston Zoo Facebook Page

This morning, we humanely euthanized our male, 20-year-old jaguar, Kan Balam. Due to the tremendous care provided to him by his keepers and our veterinary team, Kan Balam lived well beyond his expected lifespan. Jaguars expected lifespan in the wild is between 12-15 years.

The carnivore staff and veterinary team made the decision after his quality of life began to decline. Quality care and continuous advances in veterinary medicine extends animals’ lives longer than ever, with most felines in human care living well beyond previous generations. Because of this, all cats, including domestic house cats and jaguars, often spend a significant phase of their lives as older animals, and are at a higher risk for geriatric complications.

Read more about Kan B, and the love his keepers had for him on our blog: www.houstonzoo.org/blog/mourning-loss-geriatric-jaguar-kan-balam/
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This morning, we humanely euthanized our male, 20-year-old jaguar, Kan Balam.  Due to the tremendous care provided to him by his keepers and our veterinary team, Kan Balam lived well beyond his expected lifespan. Jaguars expected lifespan in the wild is between 12-15 years. 
 
The carnivore staff and veterinary team made the decision after his quality of life began to decline. Quality care and continuous advances in veterinary medicine extends animals’ lives longer than ever, with most felines in human care living well beyond previous generations. Because of this, all cats, including domestic house cats and jaguars, often spend a significant phase of their lives as older animals, and are at a higher risk for geriatric complications.

Read more about Kan B, and the love his keepers had for him on our blog: https://www.houstonzoo.org/blog/mourning-loss-geriatric-jaguar-kan-balam/

 

Comment on Facebook

Soft kitty, warm kitty, little ball of fur; happy kitty, sleepy kitty, purr purr purr #RIP #bigbangtheory

I know he lived a lot longer due to the excellent care he got at the Zoo.

Aww. When interning in the carnivore dept he was one of my faves. So smart! Ashley remember when Angie was teaching him to do the moonwalk after Michael Jackson passed?

So sorry for the loss of this beautiful creature. Kan Balam.

Is this the one that had the limp?

Thank you Houston Zoo for taking such good care of him and all the animals! I've been going to this zoo since I was little bitty. I always enjoy it.

RIP Kan Balam. You have given the visitors so much pleasure just watching you over these years. You were taken care of by top notch professional handlers, etc.

So sorry for your loss. He was a brilliant cat and he is at peace now and free.

So sorry they had to go through this, a decision that is emotional and difficult, and necessary.

Thank you to you and your staff for the years of quality care given this magnificant creature.

Sending my love to Kan Balam's keepers ❤️ This is the hardest part of our jobs 💔

We just saw Kan Balam on Monday😔.... he will be missed❤️

I am so sorry for your loss, each of these animals are precious ....

This was my daughters favorite critter at the Zoo. We always went to say hello to him before anyone else whenever we went. When she was 7 years old we sent a post out to out neighborhood on Halloween saying Paisley was asking for pocket change donations in lieu of candy for Halloween and all amounts would be donated to Kan thru the zoo. She raised over $40 in coins! I still have the letter from the zoo thanking her for her donation. He was a sweet boy and will be missed. 😔

Hugs to all of you keepers that took special care of Kan Balam.

Awe, I’m so sad to hear his quality of life was declining. But, I’m happy to know he had a long and wonderful life thanks to the wonderful teams at the Houston Zoo. He was a beautiful cat.

I'm so sorry for your loss. Thanks for taking such great care of him so he was able to live a long life. My thoughts are with his keepers and all who adored him. <3

Heartfelt condolences to the veterinary and keeper staff. Thank you for taking care of him

Katie Rose Buckley-Jones I won’t ever forget the time you asked him to bring something and he ripped off a piece of cardboard and tried to hand it to you ❤️ thank you for introducing me to him. Sending you guys many hugs

The Houston Zoo staff has lost several animals this year and I am sure each one is so hard to go through.

Thank you for providing him with a caring and enriched life. So sorry for your loss!

My thoughts of sympathy are with you all. I can't even imagine the sadness you feel today.

So sorry to read this. It is always a hard decision. RIP and run free sweet boy.

I’m so sorry for your loss. He was a beautiful cat.

So sad. Native Houstonian. He was one of my favorites.

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Social Media Guy to Sea Lion Keeper: Can you send me a pic of you working with the sea lions in this chilly weather?

Sea Lion Keeper: Sure... (sends picture next to sea lion statue)

SMG: I'm still using this.
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Social Media Guy to Sea Lion Keeper: Can you send me a pic of you working with the sea lions in this chilly weather?

Sea Lion Keeper: Sure... (sends picture next to sea lion statue)

SMG: Im still using this.

 

Comment on Facebook

Are there some zoo animals that enjoy this weather?

SMG is another reason why Houston Zoo is the best Zoo!

Happy New Year “sea lion keeper “ 💖💖

More snow for TJ and Max ❤️ lucky them!

Are we positive that’s the statue rather than it really just being that cold? 😛

That’s my best friend Sophie for ya! 😂

Brrrrr

Omg the Zoo is so awesome 😂😂😂 Alana Berry

Omg be warm sweetoe

Haha!! Good one!

Sweetie 💞

Ashley Jucker 😂

Mike DePope

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We've heard of stalagmites but is stalagmice a thing? ... See MoreSee Less

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Weve heard of stalagmites but is stalagmice a thing?

 

Comment on Facebook

Ok, it took me a minute to get this. I was literally zooming in to try to find the mouse. 🤦🏻‍♀️🙄😂

Cindy Christina Angela Ramirez see I told y’all! Lol

Andrew Kaufmann Look its Richard Jr! 😂

Wow ... good photo shot ... show the world that you need to protect your pipe ... if not, freezing water will expand the pipe and crack the pipe !!!

“Baby it’s cold outside!”

My gutters had glaciers in them!

I fell for the mouse thing too..

That's nothing! Talk to keepers from the northern states or Canada!

i was honestly looking for a mouse lol

Wow,that is so neat!

Annecia Wesley but where is the ice bacon? Lol

Johnnie R. Summerlin, cool, see the "stalagm ice"?

Two words. Pipe insulation.

That’s awesome!

Ana Rivers Smith cool!

Cortez

Pauline Ervin

Denise Daigre

Ashley Nguyen

Vicente Gonzalez

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