Nyala Babies – Bounding and Abounding

Baby Nyala Opal-0001-9371

Meet Opal. She’s one of four baby nyala born at the Houston Zoo over the past two months, and boy is she a cutie! The zoo’s keeper team noticed soon after she was born on Aug. 25 that she wasn’t nursing very well from mom, Ruby, so they quickly intervened and taught the calf to bottle-feed, but kept her living with her mother so they could continue to bond behind-the-scenes. Soon, however, the keepers saw Opal nursing from Ruby! This Monday, the team ended all bottles for Opal, and she is continuing to successfully nurse and eat solid foods which includes grain, hay, and produce.

Opal and her mom will continue to stay in their barn for a few more weeks, but guests and Members can see the other three new nyala frolicking around the yard every day at the zoo’s West Hoofed Run. Additional baby nyala include Wallace (mom Willow), born July 29; Fancy (Lola), Aug. 12; and Fern (Ivy), Sept. 8.

Baby Nyala Opal-0002-9379Nyala are members of the antelope family and the spiral-horned males can weigh up to 275 pounds and females weigh up to 150 pounds. When born, nyala generally weigh 10 pounds.



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Today, we are working with BBVA Compass Stadium to plant a new pollinator garden at the stadium! This beautiful new pollinator garden supports local pollinators like bees, butterflies, and more, and is located at the North entrance to BBVA Compass Stadium. Great partnership for an even greater good. ... See MoreSee Less

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I know you meant to say bees 🤣

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We have Attwaters prairie chicken eggs! Our bird team candles the eggs under a bright light to check on the developing chicks. The pencil marks on the eggs help us track where the air cell is within the egg. After a brief candling session, its back into the incubators.Image attachment

 

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Beautiful birds!

Hoping for great success

Kimberly Jackson

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