Happy Great Ape Day! September 9 & 10

Written by: Tammy Buhrmester, Zookeeper

Did you know that there are six distinct species of great apes and that the Houston Zoo is home to three species?

Orangutans, gorillas and chimpanzees are members of the great ape family.

Is It a Monkey or an Ape?

One easy way to tell the difference between a monkey and an ape is to look for a tail.  The great apes are tailless primates that have larger bodies and bigger brains than other primates.

The Social Lives of Great Apes

Gorillas live in “harem” groups (one adult male with several females and their offspring) of around five to ten individuals in a family group, although on occasion the group can be larger.

Chimpanzees live in multi-male, multi-female groups which can consist of a few dozen individuals, or more than one hundred.  Chimp groups practice “fusion-fission” which means smaller subsets exist with the larger group and members come together and split apart depending on food availability and other factors.

Orangutans tend to live alone more than gorillas and chimpanzees.  Adult females will travel with their offspring and recently have been found to also travel with another female and her offspring. Males and females only interact in order to produce an offspring.

The Houston Zoo Great Apes

At the Houston Zoo, we have 27 individual Great Apes; 7 gorillas, 14 chimpanzees and 6 orangutans.

When you visit the Great Ape gallery in the Africa forest, you get the opportunity to be surrounded by chimpanzees and gorillas.  When you watch the chimpanzee exhibit you may see Lucy sitting on her perch on the large termite mound watching over the group.  You may catch Lulu sitting in front of the air conditioner in the training room.  Willie our youngest male, may be in the yard playing a game of tag with Abe, Charlie, Kenya or Kira.

If you visit in the Great Ape Gallery in the morning, you will have the opportunity to see our gorilla family in their large indoor playroom.  Zuri, our dominant male of the family group may be eating or resting with his large foot resting on the glass.  Look up and you may see one of the three females sitting on the large tree or resting on the platform in the middle of the playroom.  Binti, our oldest female normally is found resting on the ground the floor on the left side of the play room. We also have three amazing bachelor males that can be seen outside in the large yard.  Mike usually can be found in the middle of the exhibit sitting under a tree and Chaka and Ajari are usually near each other.

When you visit the orangutan exhibit, you may see one or two orangutans on exhibit at the same time.  Each day, the orangutans take turns out on the exhibit. They each get several hours a day outside.  We vary the times that they go outside.  Normally we rotate them at 9AM, 12PM and 3PM.  Rudi Valentino prefers to go outside in the morning and Kelly likes to go out anytime of the day.  Pumpkin loves to sit by the glass and look at everyone visiting.  Cheyenne and Aurora usually can be found sitting around the platform at the front of the exhibit.  Aurora loves to hang out on top of the platform, so if you don’t see anyone, look up and you might see her.

Take Action: Reduce, Reuse and Recycle

One of the major threats facing Great Apes is habitat loss and fragmentation. Habitat loss due to logging, mining, palm oil plantations and human encroachment has had a devastating impact on Great Ape populations.

On Great Ape Day, we encourage everyone to reduce the use of paper products by purchasing Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) certified wood, paper and furniture products. When you are grocery shopping, read labels and purchase only products that is made with sustainable palm oil or no palm oil product.

Great Ape Day will be celebrated at the Houston Zoo on Saturday and Sunday, September 9 and 10.  Please stop by at the Africa Forest Great Ape gallery at 12:30PM to learn all about our chimpanzees and gorillas and at 3:30PM at the orangutan exhibit at the Wortham World of Primates to learn all about orangutans.

 

Houston Zoo Receives Rescued Sea Turtle in Sharpstown

On Wednesday, Aug. 30, the Houston Zoo answered the call to receive a green sea turtle who had been rescued by a resident in Sharpstown, and handed over to the firefighters at Houston Fire Station 51. The first responders named the turtle “Harvey” after the natural disaster that likely brought the turtle so far out of his natural habitat.

The resident found the turtle in road and just knew it didn’t belong this far inland.  The firefighters immediately put it into a cooler with a wet towel to maintain its body temperature and keep it wet, as directed by sea turtle biologists after the rescue was reported to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) in Galveston. NOAA, a long-time partner of the Houston Zoo, called our team to see if we could get to the turtle.

 

Fortunately, the zoo’s conservation impact manager, Martha Parker, lives a few miles from the fire department and could safely get to fire department, and also to the Houston Zoo.

The green sea turtle was checked over by one of the zoo’s four veterinarians, and found to be healthy. Harvey suffered a few minor scratches on his big journey north, and he is now safely with the zoo’s aquarium team until it can be re-released into Galveston Bay or moved to NOAA’s sea turtle facility.

If you find an injured or stranded sea turtle, please call 1-866-TURTLE-5 so someone can respond to the turtle-giving it adequate care and attention.

Houston Zoo Closes Due to Inclement Weather Forecast

The Houston Zoo’s leadership team has been monitoring the path of Hurricane Harvey, and has made the decision to close the zoo Friday, August 25 through Sunday, August 27. The safety of team members, guests and animals is the zoo’s top priority, and the leadership team made this decision with that in mind. The decision on whether the zoo will reopen on Monday, August 28 will be made as the weather event continues.

The animals will be cared for during the storm by a select group of team members who will stay at the zoo throughout the weather event. The animals have safe and secure barns and night houses that have been constructed to weather storms like this one.

Houston Zoo Eliminates Plastic Water Bottles

In 2015, the Houston Zoo removed plastic bags in the gift shops to protect animals in the wild, by eliminating an estimated 80,000 plastic bags from entering landfills and the environment each year. Now, two years later, the zoo-based conservation organization has gone one step further and eliminated single-use plastic water bottles from all concession stands.

The zoo provides veterinary care for rescued wild sea turtles that have consumed plastic every year.  The elimination of single-use plastic water bottles will have a significant, wildlife saving, impact on the environment by reducing the amount of plastic waste by nearly 300,000 single-use plastic bottles in just one year.

Guests now have two choices when purchasing water at the zoo – an aluminum reusable water bottle (pre-filled with water) or a JUST Water recyclable, paper-based water bottle at any of the restaurants or kiosks. JUST Water bottles are made up of 82% renewable resources, leaving behind a much smaller carbon footprint than bottles made entirely of plastic. The bottle itself is made of paper from certified forests and the plastic cap is made from sugarcane, making JUST Water bottles 100% recyclable.

The zoo also has water bottle refilling stations throughout its grounds. There are two types of refilling stations– free standing, green fountains and silver, chilled fountains attached to walls, made possible by a partnership with Texas Plumbing Supply.

These fountains are easily recognizable by the “Save Sea Turtles Here” signs. Using reusable water bottles and refilling them at these stations helps save sea turtles in the wild by keeping this waste out of the ocean. Plastic bottles and bags can make their way to Houston’s waterways and end up in the ocean, home to animals like sea turtles, sting rays, sharks, and an array of fish.

“The zoo is committed to saving animals, and their habitats, in the wild and this is just one more way we can inspire guests to take simple actions and join us in protecting wildlife,” says Peter Riger, vice president of conservation education. “We are using this action specifically to highlight the need to protect marine animals from debris. It also allows our guests to play a direct part in making a difference on our planet.”

Guests to the Houston Zoo can also purchase a reusable tote bag in its gift shops to eliminate use of single-use plastic bags. The zoo has a collection of canvas bags artistically designed with images depicting the animals that benefit from a reduction of plastic bags in the ocean. The series includes sea lions, sea turtles, and pelicans.

Female Baby Elephant “Joy” Born at the Houston Zoo

 

After a two-year pregnancy, the wait is over for Shanti (and all of Houston!). Yesterday at 8:27 p.m., the 26-year-old Asian elephant gave birth to a 305-pound female after a short labor, and the calf began to nurse within three hours. The calf has been named Joy by the team who have dedicated their lives to the care, well-being, and conservation of these incredible animals.

Baby elephants are quite wobbly when they’re first born, so the harness you see Joy wearing below lets our elephant team help her stand steady while she’s nursing.

Shanti gave birth in the McNair Asian Elephant Habitat cow barn under the supervision of her keepers and veterinary staff. She and the calf will undergo post-natal exams and spend several days bonding behind the scenes, before they are ready for their public debut. During the bonding period, the elephant team is watching for the pair to share several key moments like communicating with mom, and hitting weight goals.

“Our animal team is thrilled that the birth has gone smoothly,” said Lisa Marie Avendano, vice president of animal operations at the Houston Zoo. “We look forward to continuing to watch Joy and Shanti bond, and introducing her to Houston.”

This is an exhilarating summer for the elephant team. In May, the zoo opened an expanded elephant habitat which doubled the entire elephant complex and immerses guests into the lives and culture of Asian elephants. The new bull barn and expanded yard gives more room for this growing herd.

Just by visiting the Houston Zoo, guests help save baby elephants and their families in the wild. A portion of each zoo admission and membership goes straight to protecting an estimated 200-250 wild elephants in Asia. Since the Houston Zoo started its work in Borneo in 2007, there has been a doubling of the elephant population on the island. The Houston Zoo also provides funds for elephant conservationist, Nurzhafarina “Farina” Othman and her team in Asia, to put tracking collars on wild elephants. This group uses collars to follow wild elephants, conducting valuable research that aids in protecting the elephants as they travel through the forests. Farina also spends time working with farmers that grow and produce palm oil, offering her guidance in responsible cultivation practices that are wildlife-friendly.

Palm oil is an ingredient in many foods and cosmetics, typically grown in areas that were previously home to animals like wild elephants. Converting pristine forests into oil palm plantations has caused extensive deforestation across Southeast Asia.  Luckily, a growing number of producers are working to protect these areas and the animals that live there. The Houston Zoo encourages people to protect elephants in the wild by supporting companies that use responsibly sourced palm oil, increasing demand for palm oil that is grown and produced without destroying the forested homes of elephants.

Four Sea Turtles Treated at the Houston Zoo

The Houston Zoo provided veterinary care for four sea turtles on July 7. The four turtles were rescued by our partners at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administraion (NOAA) in Galveston and brought to our Animals Hospital for care. All four have all gone back to Galveston where they will be rehabilitated by NOAA until they are strong enough to be released back into the Gulf of Mexico. 

We are so fortunate to have sea turtles in our Texas waters, and it is easy for us to all be sea turtle conservation heroes! A few simple actions taken by our community can help protect sea turtles in the wild:

1) If you accidentally catch a sea turtle while fishing, please call 1-866-TURTLE-5 so a biologist can come out and respond to the turtle-giving it adequate care and attention.

2) Switch from plastic grocery bags to reusable grocery bags-our plastic bags are light and fly away easily. They can end up in our bayous and float to the ocean. Sea turtles mistake them for jellyfish, and when ingested can make them sick.

3) If you eat seafood, choose ocean-friendly seafood! Download the FREE Seafood Watch app to use on your phone. It will help tell you what seafood is best to eat because it is caught or farmed in an ocean-friendly way that protects wildlife like sea turtles, dolphins, and sharks.

 

Baby Boom at the Zoo!

Babies, babies, and more babies! This June has seen a massive baby boom throughout the Houston Zoo, with the biggest baby yet to come when later this summer, the zoo will welcome a 250-300-pound Asian elephant calf.

 

A California sea lion pup was born to first-time mother, Cali, on June 26 after a three-hour labor. The pup and Cali began to bond immediately, and nursing was spotted within hours. The sex of the pup has not yet been determined and the mother and pup will spend a while behind the scenes strengthening their bond before they are ready to make their first public appearance.

This birth is the second sea lion pup to be born at the Houston Zoo in the past year. TJ, was born to Cali’s sister Kamia just last summer.

The sea lions at the Houston Zoo play a major part in the zoo’s Take Action conservation initiatives. As ambassadors for the sustainable seafood program, the sea lions help guests understand that the simple choices they make can have a big impact on animals. The zoo’s sea lions eat 23,850 pounds of responsibly-caught, sustainable fish each year. Sustainable seafood is defined as seafood that is either responsibly wild-caught or farm-raised that not only keeps current populations of marine wildlife at balanced numbers, but ensures they thrive over the long term. The methods by which the seafood is harvested or raised must not cause undue harm to the ocean. The Houston Zoo strongly believes that embracing the use of sustainable seafood is one of the best ways we can all protect our oceans’ health.

Two red river hogs were born to first-time-mother, Luna, on Tuesday, June 27. This is the first litter of red river hogs to be born at the Houston Zoo since they were brought to Texas in 2015 for Gorillas of the African Forest. Though gorillas and red river hogs share the same forest lands in Africa, this is truly a unique experience as you won’t see them together in a shared habitat in any other zoo.

The two yet-to-be-named hoglets made their public debut today, and can be seen frolicking in the dry riverbed of the habitat along with their mother and the other two adult hogs, Neptune and Vidalia.

The Houston Zoo is protecting red river hogs in the wild by providing funding for wildlife saving education programs in the area the hogs live in Africa.  The education programs guide local people to protecting red river hogs and other local animals in the wild.

In the zoo’s aquarium department, a fever of five white blotched river stingrays were born on Sunday, June 18. The stingrays are currently behind the scenes in quarantine. They have joined the fever (or group) of stingrays that were born in January 2017 and a few born in October 2016.

Stingrays are ovoviviparous, meaning they bear live young. Once the female stingray gives birth, the babies are left on their own. They have a yolk sac from which they absorb nutrients until they can eat on their own. Stingrays, both in the wild and at the zoo, enjoy meals of worms and shrimp.

As their name would suggest, the white blotched river stingrays have several white spots on their backs. This helps them to camouflage in the rocky bottom riverbeds where they reside in the Amazon River Basin of South America. Each white blotched river stingray is unique; no two have the same spot pattern.

The Houston Zoo is working to ensure a safe environment for rays in the wild.  Plastic bags can end up in water ways and be dangerous for aquatic animals.

Guests can see two, recently hatched Palawan peacock-pheasant chicks being raised by their mother in the zoo’s Birds of the World habitat.

This small threatened pheasant species is only found on the island of Palawan in the Philippines. The males of this species are brightly colored and have eye spots on their tails, which are used in a courtship display to attract females.

The Palawan peacock-pheasant lays a clutch of two eggs that hatch after an incubation period of 18 to 20 days. The Species Survival Plan for this species is managed by Houston Zoo bird department supervisor, Mollie Coym. The zoo is helping to save this species in the wild through the Take Action Initiative for Palm Oil. Guests can also help this species in the wild by checking labels and purchasing products made with sustainable palm oil.

Ten African bush vipers were born on June 11 inside the zoo’s Reptile and Amphibian House. Like most pit vipers, the neonates were born live instead of hatched from eggs like many other types of snakes. These tiny vipers weigh-in at a mere two grams when born and are expected to grow to be between 18-24 inches long. Bush vipers vary in color, mostly shades of green, but can also be bright yellow, grey, even red.

These snakes are found in the tropical rainforests of western and central Africa and get their name from their preference for lower bushes rather than the tall canopy trees. The baby snakes will remain behind-the-scenes while they continue to grow. The Houston Zoo is saving African bush vipers in the wild by providing funds for education programs in the Democratic Republic of the Congo that empower local people to protect the forested homes of the wild African bush viper.

Houston Zoo Hires Two New Executives

The Houston Zoo has announced that two new executives will join the organization this summer. In July, non-profit industry leaders Sheryl Kolasinski and Rauli Garcia will step into their roles on the zoo’s senior leadership team and focus on bringing the organization’s mission to life through a new strategic plan and accompanying master plan.

“I am pleased to welcome two seasoned non-profit executives to the leadership team of the Houston Zoo. Chief Operating Officer Sheryl Kolasinski and Chief Administrative Officer Rauli Garcia will spearhead efforts to advance our recently adopted strategic plan and ambitious master plan, adding to the zoo’s already strong core programmatic leadership and staff,” said Lee Ehmke, president and CEO of the Houston Zoo. “Both executives bring extensive experience in the Houston and national cultural institution communities, together with impressive track records of successfully managing change and growth. They join the zoo at a very exciting time in our development, as we approach our 100th anniversary in 2022 with a redoubled commitment to saving wildlife and serving the community.”

Rauli Garcia

Rauli Garcia will start his role in the newly created position of chief administrative officer on July 5 and will be responsible for finance, purchasing, communications, marketing, and technology. Garcia will also oversee the implementation of the zoo’s new multi-year strategic plan. Rauli was recently the senior vice president of administration and chief financial officer of the Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia. Prior to joining Curtis, Rauli was the CFO of the Houston Symphony (2013-2015) and the Houston Grand Opera (2008-2013).

Rauli earned his MBA from the Jesse H. Jones Graduate School of Business at Rice University, and his Bachelor of Science in Psychology from the University of Houston. Rauli continues to be actively involved with Rice University where he served as a member of the board for the Jones Partners at the Jesse H. Jones Graduate School of Business.  He has held a Certified Financial Planner certificate and is a Certified Nonprofit Professional with the Nonprofit Leadership Alliance.

Sheryl Kolasinski

Sheryl Kolasinski will become the zoo’s new chief operating officer leading the zoo’s business operations, which includes admissions, membership, sales and events, and oversight of the zoo’s facilities maintenance and capital projects. Kolasinski will begin her role at the Houston Zoo in mid-July. Kolasinski is joining the Houston Zoo from the Menil Collection where she served as the deputy director and chief operating officer and worked closely with the museum’s director on strategic planning as well as the implementation of the museum’s master site plan (2012-2017).  Prior to Menil, Kolasinski served as the deputy director of the Smithsonian Institution’s Office of Facilities Engineering and Operations where she managed the capital design and construction program, oversaw planning and preservation, operations and maintenance, and safety and security for 19 museums and galleries, nine research centers around the world, and the National Zoo (1995-2012).

Kolasinski received her bachelor’s degree in art history from Brown University and a master’s degree in architecture from Columbia University. She is a fellow of the American Institute of Architects and a LEED accredited professional.

Tiny Animal Receives Massive Care

Written by: Ashley Hironimus, Zookeeper

At the Houston Zoo, we are dedicated to the care and welfare of our more than 6,000 animals, from two-ton elephants to two-pound meerkats. In May, one such tiny resident needed some extra love and attention.

On the afternoon of May 7 keepers at Carruth Natural Encounters noticed that Smoots, a meerkat, was limping while in his outside habitat. The team sprang to action, and quickly brought the 2.16-pound carnivore to the zoo’s on-site veterinary clinic and sedated him for x-rays to see if they could find the problem. The veterinary team discovered two clean breaks in his arm, likely from normal wrestling with his “mob” of fellow meerkats.

Smoots shortly after surgery with his bandage vest in his recovery crate

Smoots’ front left leg was wrapped in a splint by a veterinarian to keep the leg stable and a few days later, he was transported to Gulf Coast Veterinary Clinic to have a plate and screws put in his arm to stabilize and fix the bones. Surgery went well and for the next week he was housed in a large crate near the rest of the meerkats in their holding area. We worked to make him as comfortable as possible so he always had a nest of blankets to lay in, medication for pain control, and his group nearby to comfort him through the crate door. It was important for Smoots to have physical contact with the group through the crate door or they might see him as an ‘outsider’ and be attacked once he was fully reunited with them. While in recovery, he got sedated every other day for bandage changes and to check progress to see if his arm was healing well. Unfortunately, it was not. His surgery site was starting to abscess and even though the zoo’s vets did everything they could to treat the infection with antibiotics, the abscess was not healing.

At this point, the vets thought Smoots’ quality of life would be better if the arm was amputated so he could go back with the group. His amputation day was May 18 and Dr. Maryanne Tocidlowski did the surgery here at the zoo. Everything went well and the healing process was a lot quicker than anyone expected! On May 30, under the watchful eye of his keepers, Smoots went back into the meerkat yard with a few pals. He was instantly running around (the best he could) and greeting his fellow family with body checks and face rubs – which are all excellent signs.

Smoots (far left) having a snuggle with his mob-mates

Smoots has always been a dominant and rambunctious meerkat, and even with three legs he still runs around, climbs, and sometimes pushes around the other meerkats.  He also found his new favorite blanket (which the keepers call his ‘binky’), that he sometimes drags around the yard with his mouth so he can find his perfect spot.  It’s hard to notice sometimes that he has three legs because he really CAN do anything that all the other meerkats can do!

Climbing on top of some enrichment

Meerkats belong to the mongoose family and are also known as slender-tailed mongooses. These animals have a tolerance for venom, which is why they can eat scorpions and venomous snakes!  These animals are native to Angola, Botswana, South Africa, and Namibia. Here at the Houston Zoo, you can find our mob outside Carruth Natural Encounters.

Tons of Love Coming This Summer

Hope the storks have been working out, because a 250-to-300-pound bundle of joy is headed for the Houston Zoo! Shanti is pregnant and after a two-year gestation, the 26-year-old Asian elephant will give birth this summer.

Shanti is one of the Houston Zoo’s eight Asian elephants, and mother to youngest calf, Duncan (3) and Baylor (7). Zoo officials are optimistic that this pregnancy is advancing normally and on schedule. Shanti has received nearly two years of pre-natal care by the zoo’s elephant team and four veterinarians with regular ultrasounds and blood work.  The zoo team will continue to monitor Shanti as she progresses into the labor process, indicated by a hormonal change in her daily blood analysis.

Shanti will give birth in the McNair Asian Elephant Habitat cow barn under the supervision of her keepers and veterinary staff. After delivery, she and the calf will undergo post-natal exams and spend several days bonding behind the scenes. The elephant team looks forward to watching the pair share several key moments that will prepare them for their public debut. Nursing, communicating with mom, and hitting weight goals are important milestones for a growing baby elephant.

“All of our zoo staff looks forward to any baby born here,” said Lisa Marie Avendano, vice president of animal operations at the Houston Zoo. “But with the opening of our new elephant addition, this is a particularly exciting time to welcome a 250-to-300-pound Asian elephant calf into our zoo family. The beautifully designed expansion and our continued breeding program demonstrates the Houston Zoo’s commitment to the health and welfare of our herd and our mission to saving species in the wild.”

This is an exhilarating summer for the elephant team. In May, the zoo opened an expanded elephant habitat which doubled the entire elephant complex and immerses guests into the lives and culture of Asian elephants. The new bull barn and expanded yard gives more room for this growing herd.

Just by visiting the Houston Zoo, guests help save baby elephants and their families in the wild. A portion of each zoo admission and membership goes straight to protecting an estimated 200-250 wild e lephants in Asia. Since the Houston Zoo started its work in Borneo in 2007, there has been a doubling of the elephant population on the island. The Houston Zoo also provides funds for elephant conservationist, Nurzhafarina “Farina” Othman and her team in Asia, to put tracking collars on wild elephants. This group uses collars to follow wild elephants, conducting valuable research that aids in protecting the elephants as they travel through the forests. Farina also spends time working with farmers that grow and produce palm oil, offering her guidance in responsible cultivation practices that are wildlife-friendly.

Palm oil is an ingredient in many foods and cosmetics, typically grown in areas that were previously home to animals like wild elephants. Converting pristine forests into oil palm plantations has caused extensive deforestation across Southeast Asia.  Luckily, a growing number of producers are working to protect these areas and the animals that live there. The Houston Zoo encourages people to protect elephants in the wild by supporting companies that use responsibly sourced palm oil, increasing demand for palm oil that is grown and produced without destroying the forested homes of elephants.

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Keep the animals warm!

Why? What's goin on!?

Stay warm as you take care of our lovely zoo and it’s residents❤️

Misty Flanigan no zoo for Connor

Thank you to all the wonderful staff that went in to take care of their critter babies! Be safe!

Stay warm sweet animals 🦁🐯🐒🦆🐅🐆🦓🦏🐘🦍🦒

Too cold! Good idea.

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We are open on this beautiful Monday! Get out and enjoy the weather before it gets extra chilly this week.

 

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Giraffe feeding was awesome! Only wished we were given even more lettuce!

Had a great time today

We are here. 😀

Don't miss out before we turn off the lights! This is the last weekend for TXU Energy Presents Zoo Lights. Bundle up, grab your friends and family and join us for Houston's favorite hoilday tradition.

We even have a special discount to end the season. For just $9 per person, you get to see all two million lights, Candy the Zoo Lights Zebra, and musical reflection pool! zoolights.houstonzoo.org/get-tickets/
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Dont miss out before we turn off the lights! This is the last weekend for TXU Energy Presents Zoo Lights. Bundle up, grab your friends and family and join us for Houstons favorite hoilday tradition. 

We even have a special discount to end the season. For just $9 per person, you get to see all two million lights, Candy the Zoo Lights Zebra, and musical reflection pool! https://zoolights.houstonzoo.org/get-tickets/

 

Comment on Facebook

My daughter lost her FAVORITE stuffed animal last night. We were there after 8:30. Please contact me if found. She is very very sad

Dianne Ramboer Dunn and Wendy Martinez we're going tonight! Maybe I'll go live for you, grandma! : )

We visited today for daughters 3rd birthday, thank you we had a great day. It was a bit cold so we bundled up and enjoyed the zoo being so quiet, we got to feed giraffes twice! Would recommend!

How is it $9?

Cuanto esta la eñtrada y ban estar las luces mañana para ir com mi familia?

When is the last day to see the lights?

Lupe Mcmillon you should take Emma and Ethan

Aldo Castellanos Isabel Zamarripa-Hernandez Juan Francisco Hernandez $9 el boleto, que dicen?? Este es el último fin de semana

Busca quien nos lleve jajaja Socorro Garcia Ponce 🤣😂

Patricia Lozada tomorrow at 6pm meet us there? :0)

Debbie R Hernandez-Sanchez

Angel Rodriguez

Roxy AR

Valarie Ann Romero

Enrique Gonzalez last chance

Erica Villarreal 9$

Kayla Fitzpatrick

Macie Quick

Callie Wade

Hina Suleman

Griseldaa Chavezz

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