Houston Toad Release: Round 3

We are pleased to announce our third Houston toad release for the year! Last weekend, we delivered 200 juvenile toads (each averaging only between 1 – 2 grams) into an area outside of Bastrop State Park. We have now released three major life stages since March of this year – eggs, juveniles, and adults.

little toad

The toadlets released last week were from the same egg strands that were delivered to areas adjacent to Bastrop State Park in May. One of the zoo’s critical roles in the Houston toad recovery program is the maintenance of a captive assurance colony; therefore we keep back some individuals from each strand produced at the zoo that is destined for release. The captive assurance toads are in essence a “library” for the toads that we release to the wild.  These individuals that we keep will also become our breeders in the future.

We kept ~50 eggs from each of the egg strands released in May, expecting that many would not survive; however, almost all of the eggs we kept made it all the way through metamorphosis, producing too many captive assurance toads for us to keep! (This is certainly not a bad problem to have!) We contacted our collaborators at Texas State University and arranged for these “extra” juvenile toads to be released at the same ponds that the eggs (basically their brothers and sisters) had been previously taken.

little toad 2

Two of our volunteers, Stephanie (intern) and Jacquelyne (volunteer) accompanied graduate student Melissa (Texas State) and me out to the egg release sites.  The day was overcast and the ground was moist from the previous day’s rain, which are perfect conditions for toads! We placed the juvenile toads under deadfall (dead trees lying on the ground) taking special care to ensure that there was no sign of fire ants. The little toads either disappeared under the logs into hiding, or went boldly off into the woods to explore their new home.  It started raining at the last release site (again, great for toads but it made for a soggy ride home back to Houston). Cross your fingers that these summer rains keep on coming!

Melissa will continue to monitor these ponds throughout the rest of this year and next. Hopefully she will see some of our little guys again in the spring!



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